O'Reilly logo

Cutting Rhythms by Karen Pearlman

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

 

CHAPTER 11

Common Scenes

This chapter will look at two types of common scenes: two-handers (scenes with two characters talking in them) and chases. The two-handers are trickier to cut, but the chases are what win the editing awards because they are flashier, more visible editing. The analysis of each of these types of scenes draws on the theories and vocabularies proposed in this book, as well as theories proposed by others, and applies both to the practice of editing common scenes. In the case of two-handers, I will use the definition of a scene proposed by Robert McKee in Story1 to provide a framework for extracting cutting principles. When discussing chases, I will make use of the work done by Ken Dancyger in The Technique of Film ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required