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Essential System Administration, 3rd Edition by Æleen Frisch

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Filesystem Types

Before any disk partition can be used, a filesystem must be built on it. When a filesystem is made, certain data structures are written to disk that will be used to access and organize the physical disk space into files (see Section 10.3, later in this chapter).

Table 10-1 lists the most important filesystem types available on the various systems we are considering.

Table 10-1. Important filesystem types

Use

AIX

FreeBSD

HP-UX

Linux

Solaris

Tru64

Default local

jfs or jfs2

ufs

vxfs[1]

ext3, reiserfs

ufs

ufs or advfs

NFS

nfs

nfs

nfs

nfs

nfs

nfs

CD-ROM

cdrfs

cd9660

cdfs

iso9660

hsfs

cdfs

Swap

not needed

swap

swap, swapfs

swap

swap

not needed

DOS

not supported

msdos

not supported

msdos

pcfs

pcfs

/proc

procfs

procfs

not supported

procfs

procfs

procfs

RAM-based

not supported

mfs[2]

not supported

ramfs, tmpfs

tmpfs

mfs

Other

 

union

hfs

ext2

cachefs

 

[1] HP-UX defines the default filesystem type in /etc/default/fs’s LOCAL variable.

[2] This feature is deprecated and will be replaced by the md facility in Version 5.

About Unix Filesystems: Moments from History

In the beginning was the System V filesystem. Well, not really, but that’s where we’ll start. This filesystem type once dominated System V-based operating systems.[3]

The superblock of standard System V filesystems contained information about currently available free space in the filesystem in addition to information about how the space in the filesystem is allocated. It held the number of free inodes and data blocks, the first 50 free inode numbers, and the addresses of the first ...

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