File Paths

File paths are specified differently on each platform. See Table 14-3.

Macintosh pathnames take the general form:

hardDriveName:folderName1:folderName2:fileName

Windows pathnames take the general form:

X:\folder1\folder2\filename.ext

Windows uses “*” as a wildcard to match any string and as a wildcard to match a single character. The ISO 9660 standard is a disk format commonly used with CD-ROMs, but a full discussion is beyond the scope of this book. The ISO 9660 standard is implemented differently on each platform, and occasionally imposes additional restrictions on filenames and paths (see footnotes 3 and 5 to Table 14-3). The excellent white papers, Introduction to ISO 9660 and Compact Disc Terminology (available from http://www.cinram.com, or by calling 1-800-433-DISC), provide details on the ISO 9660 standard and common extensions. See also Appendix C in Director in a Nutshell for details on CD-ROM issues.

Table 14-3. Macintosh and Windows Path Specifications

Item

Macintosh

Windows 3.1/DOS

Windows 95/NT

[a]
[b]
[c]
[d]
[e]
[f]
[g]

Drive ID[a]

Name (27 chars)

Letter A-Z

Letter A-Z

Drive delimiter

:

:\

:\

Path delimiter

:

\

\

Max fileName length

31 chars

8 chars + 3-letter extension

245-255 chars[b]

Max folder name length

31 chars

8 chars

245-255 chars[b]

Max overall file path length[c]

> 255 chars (virtually unlimited)

67 chars

245-255 chars[b]

File type identified by

Hidden 4-character File Type[d]

3-letter extension

3- or 4-letter ...

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