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Microsoft® Windows® Internals: Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000, 4th Edition by David A. Solomon, Mark E. Russinovich

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Encrypting File System Security

EFS security relies on cryptography support. The first time a file is encrypted, EFS assigns the account of the user performing the encryption a private/public key pair for use in file encryption. Users can encrypt files via Windows Explorer by opening a file's Properties dialog box, pressing Advanced, and selecting the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data option, as shown in Figure 12-56. Users can also encrypt files via a command-line utility named cipher. Windows automatically encrypts files that reside in directories that are designated as encrypted directories. When a file is encrypted, EFS generates a random number for the file that EFS calls the file's file encryption key (FEK). EFS uses the FEK to encrypt the ...

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