O'Reilly logo

Modding Mac OS X by Erica Sadun

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Building Bundles

In terms of display, naming is everything. The Finder is responsible for selecting the way a directory appears: as a normal folder, as a file, or as an application. A file’s name, particularly its underlying file extension (.app), tells the Finder which kind of presentation to use. Here’s a quick-and-dirty way to test this behavior out for yourself.

  1. In the Finder, choose File New Folder (Shift-⌘-N). Give the folder a simple name (e.g., Chuck), as shown in Figure 2-3.

    A normal Mac OS X folder.

    Figure 2-3. A normal Mac OS X folder.

  2. Add a file to the folder, so that there’s at least one item inside.

  3. Single-click on the folder’s name; the name will be highlighted in light blue. Hit the Right Arrow (or Down Arrow) key to move the cursor to the end of the folder’s name, and then add a .bundle extension to the folder (e.g., Chuck.bundle). Finder accepts the update and changes to use a generic file icon, as shown in Figure 2-4.

    A folder using a .bundle extension looks like a single document.

    Figure 2-4. A folder using a .bundle extension looks like a single document.

  4. Select the folder and choose File Open (or double-click the renamed icon). An alert appears, telling you that there’s no default application specified to open your “document”

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required