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Multilevel Converters for Industrial Applications

Book Description

Modern semiconductor devices have reached high current and voltage levels, and their power-handling limits can be extended if they are used in multilevel converter configurations. To create high-performance and reliable control designs, however, engineers need in-depth understanding of the characteristics and operation of these topologies. Multilevel Converters for Industrial Applications presents a thorough and comprehensive analysis of multilevel converters with a common DC voltage source. The book offers a novel perspective to help readers understand the principles of the operation of voltage-source multilevel converters as power processors, and their capabilities and limitations.

The book begins with an overview of medium-voltage power converters and their applications. It then analyzes the topological characteristics of the diode-clamped multilevel converter, the flying capacitor multilevel converter, and the asymmetric cascaded multilevel converter. For each topology, the authors highlight particular control issues and design trade-offs. They also develop relevant modulation and control strategies. Numerous graphical representations aid in the analysis of the topologies and are useful for beginning the analysis of new multilevel converter topologies.

The last two chapters of the book explore two case studies that analyze the behavior of the cascade asymmetric multilevel converter as a distribution static compensator and shunt active power filter, and the behavior of the diode-clamped topology configured as a back-to-back converter. These case studies demonstrate how to address the associated control problems with advanced control and modulation schemes.

Examining recent advances, this book provides deep insight on the design of high-power multilevel converters and their applications. It is a valuable reference for anyone interested in medium-voltage power conversion, which is increasingly being used in industry and in renewable energy and distributed generation systems to improve efficiency and operation flexibility.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Preface
  7. About the Authors
  8. Chapter 1 Introduction
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Medium-Voltage Power Converters
    3. 1.3 Multilevel Converters
      1. 1.3.1 Symmetric Topologies
      2. 1.3.2 Asymmetric Topologies
    4. 1.4 Applications
      1. 1.4.1 Power Quality Improvement
      2. 1.4.2 Renewable Energy Interconnection
      3. 1.4.3 Variable Speed Drives
    5. 1.5 Aim of the Book
    6. References
  9. Chapter 2 Multilevel Topologies
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Generalized Topology with a Common DC Bus
      1. 2.2.1 Basic Cell
      2. 2.2.2 Generalized Topology Characteristics
      3. 2.2.3 Three-Level Generalized Topology
    3. 2.3 Converters Derived from the Generalized Topology
      1. 2.3.1 Diode-Clamped Topology
        1. 2.3.1.1 NPC Converter Topology
        2. 2.3.1.2 Four-Level Diode-Clamped Topology
        3. 2.3.1.3 Five-Level Diode-Clamped Topology
        4. 2.3.1.4 n-Level DCMC Topologies
      2. 2.3.2 Flying Capacitor Topology
        1. 2.3.2.1 Voltage on the Flying Capacitor
        2. 2.3.2.2 Four-Level Flying Capacitor Topology
        3. 2.3.2.3 Five-Level FCMC
    4. 2.4 Symmetric Topologies without a Common DC Link
      1. 2.4.1 Five-Level CCMC
    5. 2.5 Summary of Symmetric Topologies
    6. 2.6 Asymmetric Topologies
      1. 2.6.1 Hybrid Asymmetric Topologies
        1. 2.6.1.1 CCMC with Different Values of Voltage Sources
      2. 2.6.2 Combining Different Topologies
      3. 2.6.3 Cascade Asymmetric Multilevel Converter
    7. 2.7 Summary
    8. References
  10. Chapter 3 Diode-Clamped Multilevel Converter
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Converter Structure and Functional Description
      1. 3.2.1 Voltage Clamping
      2. 3.2.2 Switching Logic
    3. 3.3 Modulation of Multilevel Converters
      1. 3.3.1 Multilevel Space Vector Modulation
        1. 3.3.1.1 Hexagonal Coordinate System
        2. 3.3.1.2 Nearest Three Vectors Identification
        3. 3.3.1.3 Duty Cycle Calculation
    4. 3.4 Voltage Balance Control
      1. 3.4.1 Capacitor Voltage Calculation
      2. 3.4.2 Voltage Balance Optimization
      3. 3.4.3 Flow Diagram
    5. 3.5 Effectiveness Boundary of Voltage Balancing in DCMC Converters
    6. 3.6 Performance Results
    7. 3.7 Summary
    8. References
  11. Chapter 4 Flying Capacitor Multilevel Converter
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Flying Capacitor Topology
      1. 4.2.1 Charge Balance on the Flying Capacitors
    3. 4.3 Modulation Scheme for the FCMC
      1. 4.3.1 Phase-Shifted Carrier Pulse Width Modulation
        1. 4.3.1.1 Charge Balance Using PSPWM
    4. 4.4 Dynamic Voltage Balance of the FCMC
      1. 4.4.1 Dynamic Model
      2. 4.4.2 Tuned Balancing Network
        1. 4.4.2.1 Root Locus Analysis
    5. 4.5 Summary
    6. References
  12. Chapter 5 Cascade Asymmetric Multilevel Converter
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 General Characteristics of the CAMC
      1. 5.2.1 Modulation Strategy
      2. 5.2.2 Averaged Voltage
    3. 5.3 CAMC Three-Phase Inverter
      1. 5.3.1 Averaged Currents in the DC Bus
        1. 5.3.1.1 iDC Current
        2. 5.3.1.2 Common Mode and Differential Mode Currents
      2. 5.3.2 Common Mode Current
      3. 5.3.3 Differential Mode Harmonic Currents
    4. 5.4 Comparison of the Five-Level Topologies
      1. 5.4.1 DCMC
      2. 5.4.2 FCMC
      3. 5.4.3 CCMC
      4. 5.4.4 CAMC
    5. 5.5 Summary
    6. References
  13. Chapter 6 Case Study 1: DSTATCOM Built with a Cascade Asymmetric Multilevel Converter
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Compensation Principles
    3. 6.3 CAMC Model
      1. 6.3.1 Current Control
    4. 6.4 Reactive Power and Harmonics Compensation
      1. 6.4.1 System Model
      2. 6.4.2 Reactive Power Compensation
      3. 6.4.3 Harmonics Current Compensation
    5. 6.5 Summary
    6. References
  14. Chapter 7 Case Study 2: Medium-Voltage Motor Drive Built with DCMC
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Back-to-Back DCMC Converter
    3. 7.3 Unified Predictive Controller of the Back-to-Back DCMC in an IM Drive Application
      1. 7.3.1 Control of the Back-to-Back DCMC Converter
      2. 7.3.2 Load Converter: Predictive Torque Control
      3. 7.3.3 Line Converter: Predictive Power Control
        1. 7.3.3.1 Current and Power Calculations
        2. 7.3.3.2 Dynamic Active Power Reference Design
      4. 7.3.4 Switching Transition Constraint
    4. 7.4 Performance Evaluation
      1. 7.4.1 Mechanical Load Variation
      2. 7.4.2 Voltage Sag
      3. 7.4.3 Energy Recovery
      4. 7.4.4 Effectiveness of the DC Bus Balancing Algorithm
    5. 7.5 Summary
    6. References
  15. Index