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Programming Excel with VBA and .NET by Steve Saunders, Jeff Webb

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Chapter 14. Sharing Data Using Lists

In Microsoft Excel 2003, lists are ranges of cells that can easily be sorted, filtered, or shared. Lists are a little different from the AutoFilter feature available in earlier versions of Excel, in that lists are treated as a single entity, rather than just a range of cells. This unity is illustrated by a blue border that Excel draws around the cells in a list, as shown in Figure 14-1.

A list (left) and an AutoFilter range (right)

Figure 14-1. A list (left) and an AutoFilter range (right)

Lists have other nice-to-have advantages over AutoFilter ranges:

  • Lists automatically add column headers to the range.

  • Lists display a handy list toolbar when selected.

  • It is easy to total the items in a list by clicking the Toggle Total button.

  • XML data can be imported directly into a list.

  • Excel automatically checks the data type of list entries as they are made.

  • Lists can be shared and synchronized with teammates via Microsoft SharePoint Services.

That last item is the key advantage of lists—really, lists are just a way to share information that fits into columns and rows.

This chapter contains reference information for the following objects and their related collections: ListObject, ListRow, ListColumn, ListDataFormat, and the SharePoint Lists Web Service.

Tip

Code used in this chapter and additional samples are available in ch14.xls.

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