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Programming Visual Basic .NET by Dave Grundgeiger

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Appendix C. Cultures

The @ Page directive can include a Culture attribute that allows you to specify the language and culture for which the page is intended. This appendix lists the names of the cultures that can be supplied as arguments to the Culture attribute. A culture name has the general format

<languagecode>-<country/regioncode>

where < languagecode > is a lowercase code generally consisting of two letters that defines a language, and < country/regioncode > is an uppercase two-letter code defining the country or region in which that language is used. In a few cases, the Culture attribute takes the form

<charactercode>-<languagecode>-<countrycode>

where < charactercode > is a mixed case two-letter code (e.g., Cy for Cyrillic) indicating the character set, <languagecode> is a lowercase two-letter code indicating the language, and < countrycode > is an uppercase two-letter code defining the country in which that language and character set are used.

A culture name that takes the form < languagecode > only is a neutral culture ; it is associated with a language, but not with a particular country or region.

Culture name

LCID

Culture display name

af

54

Afrikaans

af-ZA

1078

Afrikaans (South Africa)

ar

1

Arabic

ar-AE

14337

Arabic (U.A.E.)

ar-BH

15361

Arabic (Bahrain)

ar-DZ

5121

Arabic (Algeria)

ar-EG

3073

Arabic (Egypt)

ar-IQ

2049

Arabic (Iraq)

ar-JO

11265

Arabic (Jordan)

ar-KW

13313

Arabic (Kuwait)

ar-LB

12289

Arabic (Lebanon) ...

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