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Requirements Analysis: From Business Views to Architecture by David C. Hay

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Chapter 7. Column Five: Timing

Introduction

The Timing column is intimately associated with other columns. To be meaningful, timing must be “of” something, usually either activities or data events. Moreover, often the business rules from the Motivation column also figure into any discussion of timing.

Timing is ultimately about events. These can be either business events—things happening in the world that the business must respond to—or temporal events—triggered by the passing of time. The latter often appear in the form of formal schedules. This chapter will first discuss schedules and then deal with other events.

Figure 7.1 shows the Architecture Framework with Column Five highlighted.

Figure 7.1. The Architecture Framework—Timing.

Row One: Scope ...

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