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Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Yosemite Edition by David Pogue

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Life with Microsoft Exchange

In the corporate world, Microsoft Exchange is the 800-pound gorilla. It’s the networking software that runs the email, address books, and calendars for hundreds or thousands of employees. All of this communicates with a central master database whose heart beats away in some closet or back room at your company’s headquarters.

For years, Macs have been second-class citizens in Corporate America. As long as they couldn’t talk to the Exchange brain, they weren’t much use outside the graphic-design department. (You could buy add-on software or muck with workarounds, but you always felt like a weirdo.)

Now, however, Exchange compatibility is built in. In the Mac’s Calendar, your company’s Exchange calendar shows up. In Mail, you can get all your corporate email. Best of all, this information shows up side by side with your own personal data, so you can have it all in one place. All the conveniences of OS X now apply to your corporate email: Spotlight, Quick Look, data detectors, and so on.

If your company is using Exchange 2007 or later (Service Pack 1, Update Rollup 4 and later), setting this up could not be easier.

Connecting to Exchange

To connect to your company’s Exchange system, open System Preferences→Internet Accounts. Click the big Microsoft Exchange button, and then proceed as shown in Figure 8-5.

Top: In System Preferences, fill in your Exchange information—your email address and password—as provided by your cheerful network administrator.Middle: If you entered your information correctly and your Exchange server recognized you, then this box appears, summarizing the Mac’s understanding of your Exchange account. You’re all set.If your Mac doesn’t find the server, then either (a) your company doesn’t use Exchange 2007 or later, or (b) your network geek hasn’t turned on Exchange Autodiscover. In that case, you have no choice but to call that person over to your desk and either (a) harangue him for not turning on Autodiscover, or (b) have him fill in the server address and other boxes by hand.Bottom: Which elements of your Exchange account do you want your Mac to display? If you choose Mail, for example, then your Mail app will display your Exchange email account. Contacts, Calendars, Notes, and Reminders will all show Exchange’s information as specially identified accounts, which you can hide or show with one click.

Figure 8-5. Top: In System Preferences, fill in your Exchange ...

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