Appendix A. ISO 8859-1 (Latin-1) Character Set

This appendix presents the set of ISO 8859-1 (Latin-1) characters, along with their equivalent values in decimal, octal, and hexadecimal. This character set suffices for English and languages that can be written using just the English alphabet, plus the major Western European languages. The lower half of this set of characters is identical to traditional ASCII . Table A-1 shows nonprinting characters; it’s useful when you need to represent nonprinting characters in some printed form, such as octal. For example, the echo and tr commands let you specify characters using octal values of the form \nnn. Also, the od command can display nonprinting characters in a variety of forms.

Table A-2 shows printing characters. This table is useful when using the previous commands, but also when specifying a range of characters in a pattern-matching construct. The characters from decimal 128–159 are not used in Latin-1.

Table A-1. Nonprinting characters

Decimal

Octal

Hex

Character

Remark

0

000

00

CTRL-@

NUL (Null prompt)

1

001

01

CTRL-A

SOH (Start of heading)

2

002

02

CTRL-B

STX (Start of text)

3

003

03

CTRL-C

ETX (End of text)

4

004

04

CTRL-D

EOT (End of transmission)

5

005

05

CTRL-E

ENQ (Enquiry)

6

006

06

CTRL-F

ACK (Acknowledge)

7

007

07

CTRL-G

BEL (Bell)

8

010

08

CTRL-H

BS (Backspace)

9

011

09

CTRL-I

HT (Horizontal tab)

10

012

0A

CTRL-J

LF (Linefeed)

11

013

0B

CTRL-K

VT (Vertical tab) ...

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