O'Reilly logo

Using Samba, Second Edition by David Collier-Brown, Robert Eckstein, Jay Ts

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Windows NT Domain Options

Table 4-2 shows the options that are commonly used in association with Samba on a Windows NT domain.

Table 4-2. Windows NT domain options

Option

Parameters

Function

Default

Scope

domain logons

boolean

Indicates whether Windows domain logons are to be used

No

Global

domain master

boolean

For telling Samba to take the role of domain master browser

Auto

Global

add user script

string (command)

Script to run to add a user or computer account

None

Global

delete user script

string (command)

Script to run to delete a user or computer account

None

Global

domain admin group

string (list of users)

Users that are in the Domain Admins group

None

Global

domain guest group

string (list of users)

Users that are in the Domain Guests group

None

Global

password server

string (list of computers)

List of domain controllers used for authentication when Samba is running as a domain member server

None

Global

machine password timeout

numeric (seconds)

Sets the renewal interval for NT domain machine passwords

604,800 (1 week )

Global

Here are detailed explanations of each Windows NT domain option listed in Table 4-2.

domain logons

This option configures Samba to accept domain logons as a primary domain controller. When a client successfully logs on to the domain, Samba will return a special token to the client that allows the client to access domain shares without consulting the PDC again for authentication. Note that the Samba machine must employ user-level security (security = user) and must be the PDC for this option to function. In addition, Windows machines will expect a [netlogon] share to exist on the Samba server.

domain master

In a Windows network, a local master browser handles browsing within a subnet. A Windows domain can be made up of a number of subnets, each of which has its own local master browser. The primary domain controller serves the function of domain master browser, collecting the browse lists from the local master browser of each subnet. Each local master browser queries the domain master browser and adds the information about other subnets to their own browse lists. When Samba is configured as a primary domain controller, it automatically sets domain master = yes, making itself the domain master browser.

Because Windows NT PDCs always claim the role of domain master browser, Samba should never be allowed to be domain master if there is a Windows PDC in the domain.

add user script

There are two ways in which add user script can be used. When the Samba server is set up as a primary domain controller, it can be assigned to a command that will run on the Samba server to add a Windows NT/2000/XP computer account to Samba’s password database. When the user on the Windows system changes the computer’s settings to join a domain, he is asked for the username and password of a user who has administrative rights on the domain controller. Samba authenticates this user and then runs the add user script with root permissions.

When Samba is configured as a domain member server, the add user script can be assigned to a command to add a user to the system. This allows Windows clients to add users that can access shares on the Samba system without requiring an administrator to create the account manually on the Samba host.

delete user script

There are times when users are automatically deleted from the domain, and the delete user script can be assigned to a command that removes a user from the Samba host as a Windows server would do. However, you might not want this to happen, because the Unix user might need the account for reasons other than use with Samba. Therefore, we recommend that you be very careful about using this option.

domain admin group

In a domain of Windows systems, it is possible for a server to get a list of the members of the Domain Admins group from a domain controller. Samba 2.2 does not have the ability to handle this, and the domain admin group parameter exists as a manual means of informing Samba who is in the group. The list should contain root (necessary for adding computer accounts) and any users on Windows NT/2000/XP clients in the domain who are in the Domain Admins group. These users must be recognized by the primary controller in order for them to perform some administrative duties such as adding users to the domain.

password server

In a Windows domain in which the domain controllers are a Windows primary domain controller, along with any number of Windows backup domain controllers, clients and domain member servers authenticate users by querying either the PDC or any of the BDCs. When Samba is configured as a domain member server, the password server parameter allows some control over how Samba finds a domain controller. Earlier versions of Samba could not use the same method that Windows systems use, and it was necessary to specify a list of systems to try. When you set password server = *, Samba 2.2 is able to find the domain controller in the same manner that Windows does, which helps to spread the requests over several backup domain controllers, minimizing the possibility of them becoming overloaded with authentication requests. We recommend that you use this method.

machine password timeout

The machine password timeout global option sets a retention period for Windows NT domain machine passwords. The default is currently set to the same time period that Windows NT 4.0 uses: 604,800 seconds (one week). Samba will periodically attempt to change the machine account password, which is a password used specifically by another server to report changes to it. This option specifies the number of seconds that Samba should wait before attempting to change that password. The timeout period can be changed to a single day by specifying the following:

[global]
    machine password timeout = 86400

Tip

If you would like more information on how Windows NT uses domain usernames and groups, we recommend Eric Pearce’s Windows NT in a Nutshell, published by O’Reilly.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required