Chapter 10. Network Configuration

Introduction

System administrators have to wear several different hats. They have to be part server administrator, security professional, storage administrator, and network administrator. In this chapter, I'll cover many of the network-based activities that Windows system administrators have to do, including configuring an IP address and DNS and viewing network activity.

Using a Graphical User Interface

The Network Connections applet hasn't changed significantly since Windows NT, with the exception of adding a few more tabs and buttons. You can do most network configuration tasks with it, but it is not a very efficient or intuitive interface.

For viewing current network activity, I talk about the Sysinternals TCPView (Recipe 10.9) and Microsoft Network Monitor (Recipe 10.11) later in the chapter. Both tools are invaluable for troubleshooting network connectivity issues. Get familiar with them if you haven't already.

Using a Command-Line Interface

Table 10.1 lists all of the command-line tools used in this chapter.

Table 10-1. Command-line tools used in this chapter

Tool

Windows Server 2003

Windows 2000 Server

Recipes

devcon

MS KB 311272

MS KB 311272

10.2

ipconfig

%SystemRoot%\system32

%SystemRoot%\system32

10.1, 10.4, 10.6

linkspeed

Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit

N/A

10.13

netcap

Windows Server 2003 Support Tools

N/A

10.11

netdiag

Windows Server 2003 Support Tools

Windows 2000 Support Tools

10.10

netsh

%SystemRoot%\system32

%SystemRoot%\system32

10.1, 10.3, ...

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