O'Reilly logo

ZeroMQ by Pieter Hintjens

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

The Extended Reply Envelope

Now let’s extend the REQ-REP pair with a ROUTER-DEALER proxy in the middle and see how this affects the reply envelope. This is the extended request-reply pattern we already saw in Chapter 2. We can, in fact, insert any number of proxy steps (Figure 3-2). The mechanics are the same.

Extended request-reply pattern

Figure 3-2. Extended request-reply pattern

The proxy does this, in pseudo-code:

prepare context, frontend and backend sockets
while true:
    poll on both sockets
    if frontend had input:
        read all frames from frontend
        send to backend
    if backend had input:
        read all frames from backend
        send to frontend

The ROUTER socket, unlike other sockets, tracks every connection it has, and tells the caller about these. The way it tells the caller is by sticking the connection identity in front of each message received. An identity, sometimes called an address, is just a binary string with no meaning except “this is a unique handle to the connection.” Then, when you send a message via a ROUTER socket, you first send an identity frame.

The zmq_socket() man page describes it thusly:

When receiving messages, a ZMQ_ROUTER socket shall prepend a message part containing the identity of the originating peer to the message before passing it to the application. Messages received are fair-queued from among all connected peers. When sending messages a ZMQ_ROUTER socket shall remove the first part of the message ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required