PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide

Errata for PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page ix
Under the listing for chapter 18, the third heading now reads

Fourth Generation: Palm IIIx, IIIe, and Palm V

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page xxii
In the first paragraph, the first three occurences of

"PalmPilot" have been chaned to "Palm"

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page ix
The following entry was added to Chapter 18's list of entries

Third Generation Palm III and Palm Clones......495

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page xvi
The last sentence on the page read

Symbol then announced its own PalmPilot series-- equipped with laser barcode readers--and other companies are certain to join the party. It now reads: Symbol then announced its own PalmPilot series-- equipped with barcode readers--and TRG and Handspring have since joined the party.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page xviii
The first line of the second paragraph read

This edition of "PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide" covers those new models, along with the third 1999 release, the Palm IIIx. It now reads: This edition of "PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide" covers those new models, along with the Palm IIIe and IIIx, Handspring Visor, and so on.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page xxi
Added the following information into the "How to Contact Us" section

We have a web site for the book, where we'll list examples, errata, and any plans for future editions. You can access this page at: http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/9781565926004/

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2000
Printed
Page xvi
The last paragraph of the page was replaced with

"But the story didn't end there. In late 1997, IBM announced that it would begin selling PalmPilots under its own name: the IBM WorkPad. To this day, Palm continues to license its operating system and technology. Already, Symbol, TRG, Qualcomm, and Handspring have joined the party, each marketing another line of PalmPilot clones; By 2001, Nokia and Sony will emerge with Palm OS devices of their own."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page xviii
The text used to read

"This edition of PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide covers those new models, along with the Palm IIIe, IIIx, Handspring Visor, and so on." It now reads: "This edition of PalmPilot: The Ultimate Guide covers those new models, along with the Palm IIIe, IIIx, color Palm IIIC, Handspring Visor, and so on."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page xix
The text used to read

"This book covers every model of PalmPilot through June 1999, from the original Pilot Model to the Palm VII." It now reads: "This book covers every model of PalmPilot through May 2000, from the original Pilot model to the Palm IIIc."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 15
The heading

Symbol SPT 1500 now reads: Symbol SPT 1500, 1700

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 15
The heading Palm IIIx and the paragraph below it were replaced with

"Palm IIIx, IIIxe As far as the workings are concerned, the Palm IIIx and IIIxe are almost identical to the Palm III-and to each other. But they have a much sharper screen, a more rugged design, and a new processor, the Motorola Dragonball EZ, which may lead to less expensive memory upgrades. The biggest difference is the memory: 4MB in the IIIx, 8MB in the IIIxe."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 15
The heading

"Palm V" was replaced with: "Palm V, Palm Vx"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 16
The text used to read

"(Adapters will soon be available)" It now reads: "(Adapters are available, however)"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 16
The text used to read

"Otherwise, though, the Palm V is every bit the status-symbol PalmPilot the manufacturer intended." It now reads: "Otherwise, though, the Palm V (like its 8MB sibling, the Vx) is every bit the status-symbol PalmPilot the manufacturer intended"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 17
The side bar "The Code-Name Game" was removed and replaced with the

following text: "Palm IIIc For years it was considered the Holy Grail: a color PalmPilot. Palm fans grumbled quietly that far less elegant Windows CD devices were available with color screens. But Palm pointed out that those devices got only eight hours per battery charge, nowhere close to the weeks of use available on Palm devices. Palm repeatedly insisted that it would produce no color palmtop until screen and battery technologies were available that would let the company do a color palmtop right. Finally, in February 2000, the Palm IIIc, the first color Palm device, appeared in an elongated, dark gray version of the Palm III case. The screen is gorgeous-not just because it's in color, but because it's crisp black on a white (not gray-green) background. It's also backlit full-time, like a TV. No Palm screen has ever been brighter or easier to read (except in bright sunlight, where the Palm IIIc screen fades away almost completely). The IIIc uses rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, much like the Palm V; a charge lasts about two weeks. The battery recharges whenever it's in the HotSync cradle. (An optional travel charger is also available.) When Palm fans finally got the color device they'd asked for, the next question was, "Why?" The new OS 3.5 offers a few subtle color tweaks (menus are blue, not black), comes with four color programs (such as a photo viewer and Backgammon), and runs the new shareware programs that capitalize on the color characteristics. Many Palm fans, however, opted for the long battery life and smaller device size that comes with the old-style grayscale screens."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 18-19
The last heading and paragraph read

Future models Palm Computing introduced four new models in the first half of 1999 alone, and it isnıt finished yet. Like any high-tech company, it keeps its products secret until theyıre ready. Itıs safe to assume, however, that the future will bring PalmPilot models with improvements in battery life, memory capacity, price, and--especially in light of the Palm V's enormous success--case designs. Future editions of this book, and its Web site at http://palmpilot.oreilly.com, will keep you posted. It now reads: Palm IIIe July 1999 saw Palm's low-cost answer to the cheap Palm knockoffs that rival manufacturers had introduced: The Palm IIIe. The new model offers the same size, shape, features, and sharp screen as its sibling, the Palm IIIx. The IIIe's three dramatic differences: first, it lacks the IIIx's expansion slot; second, it has only 2MB of RAM; and third, the price hit a new Palm low: $230. For the vast majority of Palm owners who never upgrade their machines, the IIIe is an economical option.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 19
Second line read

and third, the price hit a new Palm low: $230. It now reads: and third, the price hit a new Palm low: $179.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 19
The following text was inserted before "Executive Tip Summary:"

Handspring Visor In 1998, PalmPilot inventor Jeff Hawkins left Palm to found a rival palmtop maker called Handspring (www.handspring.com). The technology world held its breath. What could top the elegant simplicity design of his first creation? What could Hawkins and his team possibly build for an encore? The answer: a PalmPilot clone. In most regards, Handspring's weirdly named Visor is identical to a PalmPilot. It uses the same OS, can run the same add-on programs, and sports the same four buttons that launch your calendar, phone book, to do list, or memo pad. Everything in this book, and all the software on the CD, works on the Visor. But the Visor is noticeably faster than Palm devices; it includes beefed-up Date Book and Calculator programs; its HotSync cradle has a USB connector, meaning faster HotSync times and convenience for Mac users; and, above all, it features an expansion slot on the back half of the device. Into this space you can insert what's called a Springboard module-a black plastic cartridge that contains its own self-launching, self-configuring software. Due in 2000, according to Handspring, are a modem, wireless modem, pager, Bluetooth wireless network module, digital camera, thermometer, MP3 player, GPS (global positioning satellite) receiver, voice recorder, cell phone, and so on. The irony is delicious: Among the features Hawkins stubbornly resisted putting into the original Pilot, in the name of simplicity and low cost, was an expansion slot-which is the Visor's biggest selling point. The Visor's price is its other breakthrough feature: $149 without a HotSync cradle, $179 with, and $249 for the 8MB Deluxe model.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 19
The text used to read

"...and third, the new price hit a new Palm low: $179." It now reads: "...and third, the price hit a new Palm low: $149. (As with the Visor, the IIIe's operating system can't be upgraded, however.)"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 29
The second paragraph read

Actually, though, the A-through-Z screen that first appears isn't the useful one; most people have mastered the basic alphabet within an hour of turning on the PalmPilot. The more useful screens are the ones that appear when you tap the down-pointing triangle - the wackier and less intuitive symbols for punctuation and international symbols. Tap the Done button to return to whatever you were doing. It now reads: Actually, though, the default A-through-Z screen that first appears isn't the useful one. For the less intuitive punctuation and international symbols, tap the down-pointing triangle on the A-Z screen. Better yet, try this tip: make the punctuation dot or slash (see the inside covers of this book) before making the Ronomatic Stroke. You jump directly to the corresponding page of the cheat sheet.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 40
The second paragraph read

In either case, you make the Graffiti screen go away simply by tapping anywhere on it. It now reads: In either case, you make the Graffiti screen go away by tapping the Done button.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 91
The third line on the page read

You can see an example in Figure 4-26 It now reads: You can see an example in Figure 4-25

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 131
The sidebar title has been changed from

HotSyncing Without a Cradle to: USB and Infrared HotSyncing also, the second paragraph of the sidebar now reads: The world is hard at work addressing cases like these. Palm's $40 PalmConnect USB adapter, for example, lets you plug your HotSync cradle into the USB jack of any USB-equipped Macintosh or PC. (Macintosh fans who use the PalmConnect or one of its rivals, such as the $40 Keyspan USB PDA Adapter, don't need Palm's $6 Macintosh serial-cable adapter.)

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 132
The second paragraph read

When installing the Windows software for the Palm V, Palm IIIx, or a later model, on the other hand, It now reads: When installing the Windows software for the Palm V, Palm IIIx, or a later model (but not the Palm IIIe),

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 133
The second line of the second paragraph read

On the Macintosh, you're offered a choice of modem or (if you've installed appropriate IR software) infrared ports. It now reads: On the Macintosh, you're offered a choice of modem, USB, or infrared ports (if you've installed appropriate software).

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 139
The second paragraph under the "How a HotSync Works" read

HotSync's smarts are made possible by its internal record dating--every single tidbit of information is quietly date-stamped when you create, delete, or change it. That's how the HotSync software decides who's "right" - your PC or your PalmPilot--when the data is different on each machine. It now reads: HotSync's smarts are made possible by its internal change-stamping-when you create, delete, or change a record, it's marked as HotSync-needy. (Programmers might say that its "dirty bit" is flipped.) Only changed records are actually transmitted during the standard HotSync cycle.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 142
In the special tips box

The instructions for addding the super verbose hotsync log is listed in the book as "C:palmhotsync.exe-v", but should be "C:palmhotsync.exe -v". A space is missing before the "-v".

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 145
The first paragraph read

It's perfectly safe to synchronize one PalmPilot with two different computers. Just install Pilot Desktop on each PC, maybe buy an extra HotSync cradle for the second computer, and you're in business. (HotSyncing takes longer than, but it gets done eventually.) The PalmPilot keeps everything straight, even if you make changes on both PC's simultaneously - at each HotSync, the PalmPilot simply assumes that that information has been updated since the last HotSync, regardless of which computer it's attached to. It now reads: It's perfectly safe to synchronize one PalmPilot with two different computers. Buy a cradle for the second computer, and you're in business. Then, to guarantee perfect unison among the three machines, treat the PalmPilot as the master. That is, HotSync with your office PC before leaving for home, and vice versa. The PalmPilot will keep everything straight on all three computers. (HotSyncing takes longer, because it must compare every record instead of only the changed ones, but it gets done eventually.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 159
The warning read

Despite the many possibilities for inclusion in your PalmPilot's dialing string--commas, calling card numbers, access numbers, and so on--the most the machine can dial is 36 digits. If the total number of numbers, commas, prefixes, country codes, and so on is more than 36, your call won't go through. That's a definite disappointment for anyone who wants to call internationally using a calling card! It now read: Despite the possibilities for inclusion in your dialing string - commas, calling cards, access numbers, and so on - the most Pilot and PalmPilot models can dial is 36 digits. If the total number of numbers, commas, and so on is more than 36, your call won't go through. (That disappointment for international calling-card fans was alleviated in the Palm III and later models, which permit 52 characters.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 243
The first full paragraph on the page read

This book assumes that you're using this dramatically improved software, known collectively as the Mac Pac 2.1. (It's available at no charge from www.palm.com.) To make a new PalmPilot work with the Mac, you still need to make one additional purchase -- either the $15 Mac Pac kit (which includes the Mac Pac software, a printed manual, and an adapter for your HotSync cable that fits a standard Macintosh modem port) or the $5 cable adapter by itself (which assumes that you have downloaded the software and an electronic manual from the Palm Web site). But the resulting system is a true delight: sophisticated, fast software on the Macintosh talking to the greatest palmtop on Earth. It now reads: This book assumes that you're using this dramatically improved software, known collectively as the Mac Pac 2. (It's on this book's CD-ROM.) To make a new PalmPilot work with the Mac, you still need to make one additional purchase -- either Palm's $6 cable adapter (for Macs with serial ports) or a USB adapter (such as Palm's $40 PalmConnect). (Don't waste your money on the $15 Mac Pac kit; you already have the software it comes with, and this chapter is a much better manual than the printed one in the Mac Pac kit.) But the resulting system is a true delight: sophisticated, fast software on the Macintosh talking to the greatest palmtop on Earth.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 246-247
The text under "HotSync Manager" read

This command launches the extremely important HotSync Manager program, described later in this chapter. (HotSync Manager installs new programs onto your palmtop, controls which data gets exchanged with your Mac, allows you to use your modem port for other functions, and more.) It now reads: This command gives you access to the very important HotSync Manager program, described later in this chapter. (If you have the MacPac 2.5 or later, this command offers a submenu of commands instead of launching a separate HotSync Manager application.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 272
The second paragraph under "Hotsync Manager" read

To open this program, choose its name from the Instant Palm Desktop menu (see Figure 9-1). You see HotSync Manager's main screen, a glorified on/off button for your ability to HotSync. And why would you ever want to select Disabled, which tells your Mac to ignore the HotSync cradle? Because when HotSync Manager is Enabled, you can't use its Macintosh jack for any other purpose. No other gadget-no MIDI, modem, or digitizing tablet-will work when it's plugged into that port while HotSync Manager is enabled. It now reads: To open this program, choose its name from the Instant Palm Desktop menu (see Figure 9-1). (If you have MacPac 2.5, choose Setup from the HotSync Manager submenu.) You see HotSync Manager's Setup screen, a glorified on/off button for your ability to HotSync. Select Disabled, which tells your Mac to ignore the HotSync cradle, when you want to use the HotSync cradle's jack for another purpose - MIDI, modem, or digitizing tablet, for example. None of them work when plugged into that port while HotSync Manager is enabled.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 274
Top of the page

Now you launch Palm Desktop, only to discover that her calendar shows up. To view a different set of data -- your own -- follow these steps: 1. Choose File -->Open. As shown in Figure 9-17, the standard Mac Open File dialog box appears. 2. Navigate to the Palm folder on your hard drive. Open it, then the Users folder inside it, then the folder with your name on it; finally, double-click the User Data file (as shown in the figure). Your data now appears in Palm Desktop. It now reads: Now you launch Palm Desktop, only to discover that her calendar shows up. If you have MacPac 2.5, switching to your own data is as easy as choosing your name from the User: pop-up menu on the toolbar. If you have MacPac 2.1, however, follow these steps: 1. Choose File -->Open (see Figure 9-17). 2. Navigate to the Palm folder. Open it, then the Users folder inside it, then the folder with your name on it; finally, double-click the User Data file. Your data now appears in Palm Desktop.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 274
The caption under the figure read

Figure 9-17. Switching users in Palm Desktop isn't simple, but it can be done. It now reads: Figure 9-17. Switching users in Palm Desktop 2.1 isn't simple, but it can be done.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 276
The bottom of the page

1. Launch HotSync Manager, as described earlier in this chapter. Choose Users -->Show Palm User List. In the dialog box that appears, click New Profile, type a name (such as "Company Data") and click OK. Close the window. 2. Choose Users -->Select Current Palm User. In the next dialog box, choose your profile's name. Click OK. If you like, choose HotSync -->Install and load up any Palm programs you want every device to receive. (See Chapter 7 for details on installing programs.) Now reads: 1. From the Instant Palm Desktop icon, choose HotSync Manager-->Edit Users (MacPac 2.5) or HotSync Manager-->Users-->Show Palm User List (MacPac 2.1). In the dialog box, click New Profile, type a name (such as "Company Data"), and click OK. Close the window. 2. Choose Users -->Select Current Palm User. In the next dialog box, choose your profile's name. Click OK. If you like, choose HotSync -->Install and load up any Palm programs you want every device to receive.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 278
In the table

BrainForest is an outliner/thought processor for both Macintosh and the PalmPilot, with two-way HotSyncing. It now reads: BrainForest is an outliner/thought processor for both Macintosh and the PalmPilot; two-way syncing is planned for early 2000.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 281
The sidebar used to read

To-Do List for Palm Desktop 2.5 Although Palm Desktop 2.1 is a dramatic improvement over what came before it, a few rough edges remain. For example, you may have noticed that Palm Desktop has no facility for viewing or even honoring the records designated as Private on your PalmPilot. The program could use an easier method of switching among Palm Desktop user files, too. Network HotSyncing, as described in Chapter 6, is also Windows-only exclusive. Finally, Palm Desktop for Macintosh doesnıt support the File Linking feature offered in Windows, which permits multiple PalmPilots to load a standardized set of address book and memo data (described near the end of Chapter 8). Version 2.5, anyone? It now reads: To-Do List for Palm Desktop 3.0 As this book went to press, Palm Desktop 2.5 was in final testing. It offers two welcome improvements over the 2.1 release: a User pop-up menu on the Palm Desktop toolbar that lets you easily switch between different PalmPilotsı contents, and direct access to all HotSync Manager commands in the Instant Palm Desktop menu. But Palm Desktop still has no facility for viewing or even honoring the records designated as Private on your PalmPilot. Network HotSyncing, as described in Chapter 6, is also Windows-only exclusive. Finally, Palm Desktop for Macintosh doesnıt support the File Linking feature offered in Windows (described near the end of Chapter 8). Version 3, anyone?

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 281
The first line in the sidebar read

As this book went to press, Palm Desktop 2.5 was in final testing. It now reads: In Fall of 1999, Palm released Palm Desktop 2.5 (it's on this book's CD).

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 331
The second paragraph from the bottom of the page read

(At this writing, HanDBase Desktop doesn't perform two-way, record-by-record HotSyncing of Windows database information. Version 2, however, due in mid-1999, is scheduled to make the process automatic.) It now reads: (At this writing, HanDBase Desktop doesn't perform two-way, record-by-record HotSyncing of Windows database information. That feature is on the programmer's front-burner to-do list for 2000.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 337
The following paragraph was added to the bottom of the page

(Late 1999 saw the release of JFile Pro, a Palm database that's five times faster than the original, offering font choices, larger field capacity, and other enhancements. Be sure to download the corresponding new version of FMSync.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 348
Near the bottom of the second paragraph

Some e-mail programs, including pdQmail and MultiMail, It now reads: Some e-mail programs, including Eudora for Palm and MultiMail,

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 349
The second paragraph read

You also need an email program, such as pdQmail, It now reads: You also need an email program, such as Eudora for Palm,

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 369-372
All occurences of pdQmail have changed to Eudora.

Following is the text as it appears now, starting from the bottom of page 369, under the heading "pdQmail:" Eudora for Palm (pdQmail) If you're lucky enough to own a pdQ phone, then you're already familiar with Eudora for Palm (formerly pdQmail). It's the e-mail program built into that combination PalmPilot/cell phone. You'd expect an e-mail program designed for such an expensive gadget to be a very high caliber; in this case, you'd be right. Eudora is an extremely full-featured, well-designed e-mail program (see Figure 13-14). Among its most remarkable aspects: it can handle e-mail using either of the two methods described the beginning of this chapter. If your PalmPilot has a modem, Eudora can get your mail directly from the Internet. If not, Eudora can HotSync your messages with your Windows PC, so that you can read them, and reply to them, on the road. Figure 13-14: Eudora (pdQmail)'s folder menu (left) gives statistics about the number of messages in each folder. Right: Eudora is the only e-mail program for the PalmPilot that shows text formatting. (The dotted underline means italic.) Eudora via PC If you choose to HotSync your e-mail to the PalmPilot, run the included Eudora Conduit application. To your standard list of conduits (see "The Concept of Conduits" in Chapter 6), it adds a Eudora conduit containing the usual choices -- Synchronize, Handheld overwrites Desktop, and so on. During the installation of this conduit, you'll be asked to specify your Windows e-mail program. Eudora for Palm can handle Eudora, Outlook Express, Outlook 98, or any generic MAPI e-mail program. (The 1.0 release of Eudora can't HotSync with Netscape products, America Online, Lotus Notes, or cc:Mail.) When the installation is over, the Eudora conduit synchronizes your e-mail beautifully with your Windows e-mail program. Messages from your PC's Inbox are automatically copied to Eudora on the PalmPilot; replies you write on the PalmPilot are delivered to your PC's Outbox; and messages you delete on the PalmPilot are also deleted on the PC. The Eudora feature list At 216 K, Eudora isn't what you'd call petite. But in power and features, the program is unmatched: _ Eudora is the only Palm e-mail program that displays text formatting, such as bold and italics, which is often included in HTML-formatted messages (see Figure 13-14, right). (This formatting shows up only on directly downloaded mail, not mail HotSynced from your PC.) _ You can sort your list of messages by date, subject, sender, thread, priority, and so on. (Tap Menu -->Options -->Sorting and Columns.) _ As in other Palm e-mail programs, you can specify that you'd like a standard signature appended to the end of each email you send. But in Eudora, you can choose to have this signature included either globally or on a message-by-message basis. _ You can assign a priority to each outgoing message, for the benefit of those e-mail programs (such as Outlook) that display priority information in the recipient's Inbox. _ Eudora uses "excerpt bars," which help to identify portions of messages that have been forwarded or quoted back -- a more less distracting alternative to the greater-than symbols (>) that generally precedes each quoted line. (See Figure 13-15, left, for an example.) _ The program's filters offer extensive control over what messages are fetched at each online session or HotSync. In order to conserve time and Palm memory, you can specify that you want to get only the first, say, 20 lines of each message. You can also limit your downloading to the most recent X number of messages you've received. _ Those same filtering commands let you omit messages from certain people, with certain subject lines, to certain recipients, and so on -- or include only messages that meet those criteria (Figure 13-15, right). You can also use filters to automatically file downloaded mail into the Eudora mailboxes you've set up. (To see your options, tap Menu -->Options -->Filters -->New. Figure 13-15: Left: The vertical bar at the left edge of a message indicates material that is being quoted or forwarded. Right: Eudora filters at work screening out spam junk mail. A trial version of Eudora is included with this book. It's available from www.qualcomm.com/pdq as shareware, or with the Qualcomm pdQ PalmPilot/cell phone itself. MultiMail Like Eudora for Palm, MultiMail is an impressive, full-featured.....

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 379
The last bullet item read

Like the other state-of-the -art Palm e-mail programs, One-Touch Mail can quickly download only a list of your waiting mail; just tap the ones whose full-length bodies you'd like to download the next time you go online. It now reads: One-Touch Mail 2.0 is the most connectable e-mail program available. It can send and receive messages regardless of the modem: via snap-on Palm modem, by Novatel wireless modem, by infrared (and wirelessly) via Glenayre pager or an infrared-equipped cell phone, by attachment kit to other cell phones, and so on.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 381
The first heading read

pdQmail and MultiMail It now reads: Eudora (pdQmail) and MultiMail

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 383
The following paragraph has been added to the top of the page

The final word isn't yet in on the America Online/Palm relationship. In 1999, the two companies announced an alliance that will bring AOL e-mail to the Palm platform--both in a Palm VII wireless version and a standard Palm modem-compatible version. News will be posted at http://palmpilot.oreilly.com when the time comes.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 383
The top of the page

The Palm/AOL Collaboration The final word isn't yet in on the America Online/Palm relationship. In 1999, the two companies announced an alliance that will bring AOL e-mail to the Palm platform-both in a Palm VII wireless version and a standard Palm modem-compatible version. News will be posted at http://palmpilot.oreilly.com when the time comes. Has been changed to read: AOL Mail for Palm Organizers If you've got 425K to spare on your palmtop-that's a lot-the least expensive and most official method of checking your America Online messages is the AOL/Palm joint project called AOL Mail (included on this book's CD). You specify your screen name and local AOL phone number (which the program offers to look up for you), and you're in business. You see "tabs" for New Mail, Read Mail, and Sent Mail; you can delete, forward, and reply to messages in the usual ways. Requires a Palm III or later and a clip-on modem. The second to last line in the second bullet item read: And pdQmail correctly displays It now reads: And Eudora for Palm correctly displays The third bullet item was removed.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 438
Last paragraph of the sidebar

They do get transferred to your Windows PC (not, alas, Macintosh) at HotSync time. It now reads: They do get transferred to your Windows PC (or Mac, if the Palm VII Conduit, included with this book, is installed) at HotSync time.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 439
End of the third paragraph read

they should know better It now reads: they should know better. (note the period)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
Printed
Page 440
The last section of the page read

The future of iMessenger Clearly, iMessenger is very well designed for its advertised purpose -- the creation and reception of short messages sent by Internet email. In this limited scope -- as a sort of email-based pager -- iMessenger is fine. As an actual email program, however, iMessenger has plenty of room to grow, especially when it comes to accessing your messages in other ways. It would be nice, for example, to be able to view your messages on your desktop PC, in the Palm Mail application, or even at the Palm.Net Web site, for those occasions when you want to check your email without racking up your Palm.Net bill. Palm Computing is well aware of iMessenger's fledgling status, and is already at work expanding its capabilities. Since the software in the all current Palm models can be upgraded using a software updater, enhancing iMessenger in the future will be a simple matter of downloading an updating program from the Web and running it while your Palm VII is sitting in its cradle. It now reads: Overcoming iMessenger's limitations Clearly, iMessenger is very well designed for its advertised purpose -- the creation and reception of short messages sent by Internet email. In this limited scope -- as a sort of email-based pager -- iMessenger is fine. As an actual email program, however, iMessenger has plenty of room to grow, especially when it comes to accessing your messages in other ways. It would be nice, for example, to be able to view your messages on your desktop PC, in the Palm Mail application, or even at the Palm.Net Web site, for those occasions when you want to check your email without racking up your Palm.Net bill. But while we wait for Palm Computing to beef up iMessenger, proceed immediately to www.thinairapps.com. There you'll find the remarkable (and free) ThinAirMail program, which lets your Palm VII get e-mail from your existing Internet email address. ThinAirMail neatly bypasses one of the iMessenger's biggest limitations-its demand that you use a separate e-mail address for your Palm VII.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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The following paragraph was added to the end of the sidebar

Another astonishingly useful PQA is SnakeEyes. It shatters the Palm VII's restriction to a tiny subset of Web pages. Instead, SnakeEyes lets you write in any Web URL-and shows you just the text from that Web page. You're spared the expense of downloading graphics, and yet you're free to suck the important stuff--text--from any Web page in the world. Visit www.snakefeet.com for a free copy.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 465
The last paragraph of the note read

And what if you have a Palm V, which has neither an unscrewable stylus cap nor a battery compartment? Well, you could always carry around a paper clip in your sock. It now reads: The packaging for some Palm models, such as the Palm V, contain two different stylus versions: one plastic and one metal. A note to the easily frustrated: The plastic oneıs stylus tip doesn't unscrew.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
Printed
Page 485
The text used to read

"But the Palm III and subsequent models come with flash RAM..." It now reads: "But the Palm III and many subsequent models come with flash RAM..."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 485
The text used to read

"In effect, your "2MB" Palm III, Palm V, or Palm VII actually has 4MB of memory. And the Palm IIIx, advertised to have 4MB or RAM, actually has six. In each case, an unadvertised 2 MB is reserved for the operating system and built-in programs." It now reads: "In effect, your "2MB" Palm III, IIIc, or V actually has 4MB of memory. The "4MB" Palm IIIx actually has six; the "8MB" IIIxe actually has ten. In each case, an unadvertised 2MB is reserved for the operating system and built-in programs."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 488
The url at the top of page read

http://www.pstech.de.ppp It now reads: http://www.pstech.de/ppp

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
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Page 495
The heading on the page now reads

Third Generation: Palm III and Palm Clones

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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The second heading,

Symbol SPT 1500 now reads: Symbol SPT 1500, 1700 also, the last paragraph has been changed from: In the meantime, you can have a blast just drawing on the walls using the laser beam as a pointer (not into people's eyes, please). to: The SPT 1700 is the same idea, but ruggedized to withstand water, dust, and five-foot drops. Its sibling, the 1740, also transmits the data it collects wirelessly to the office network, to the delight of hospital, warehouse, and rental-car return-aisle staffs.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
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Page 498-499
The following sections were removed

IBM WorkPad Symbol SPT 1500 Qualcomm pdQ SmartPhone They were replace with the following: IBM, Symbol, Qualcomm, TRG, and HandSpring In a stealthy, careful long-term plan to make the Palm OS take over the earth, Palm Computing continues to license its technology. Each licensee is offered a contract only if the company offers a market or a technology that Palm itself can't, or doesn't want to, develop itself. For example, IBM produces clones of the Palm III (called the WorkPad 86022X), Palm IIIx (the 80230X), and Palm V (the 86040U). These devices are identical to their 3Com equivalents except for the case colors, which are black instead of gray, and on/off button, which is red instead of green. (Details are at www.pc.ibm.com/us/workpad/index.html.) Symbol (www.symbol.com), a long-standing manufacturer of bar-code readers, added an integrated laser-beam barcode reader to the basic Palm III. When equipped with software that you must find, or write, yourself, the resulting SPT 1500 holds great promise for warehouse inventory-takers, forward-thinking grocery stores, doctors and nurses, and anyone else for whom data collection in the field is important. The ruggedized 1700 family is even more impressive, offering a wireless network that blasts scanned data to a central computer via radio waves. Picture a PalmPilot nestled into the handset of a digital cell phone, and you'll get the idea behind Qualcomm's pdQ SmartPhone (www.qualcomm.com/pdQ). Any number in your Address Book can be dialed automatically, wherever you are; likewise, e-mail directly from your Address Book is instantaneous and wireless. 1999 saw the release of two SmartPhone models: the 800 (a dual-mode, analog/CDMA digital cell phone) and the 1900 (a CDMA digital Sprint PCS phone). Neither is nearly as compact as, say, a cell phone or a PalmPilot. But for Palm fans trying to consolidate their gadgets, the ingenious, expensive pdQ is a tantalizing prospect. In late 1999, TRG (www.trgpro.com), a longtime RAM-upgrade provider for Palm devices, rolled out its TRG Pro: a Palm III with a CompactFlash slot at the top rear. Into this slot, you can snap tiny CompactFlash storage cards, which hold either additional RAM or even miniature hard drives, such as IBM's 340-megabyte minidrive. You'll never have to delete another program. By far the biggest news in Palm licensees, however, is the Handspring Visor, the creation of original Palm Computing leaders Jeff Hawkins, Donna Dubinsky, and Ed Colligan (www.handspring.com). This device offers a few minor improvements-a spruced-up Date Book, slightly faster operation, a USB cradle, and rock-bottom pricing. But it's the one major change that made the headlines: the Springboard slot. As noted in Chapter 1, all kinds of modules are under development for this slot, from RAM-upgrade and software-collection modules to pagers, wireless modems, and cell phones. The year 2000 should bring an explosion in Springboard modules, making the Visor the GameBoy of palmtops.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 499-500
The section "Fourth Generation: Palm IIIx and Palm V" used to

read: Two new models debut in February 1999: the Palm IIIx and Palm V. Aside from the physical characteristics described below, one of the most important internal changes was the introduction of a new processor -- the Motorola Dragonball EZ (instead of the traditional Dragonball). While similar to its predecessor in many ways, this chip accepts less expensive memory modules, which means that these models' list prices may well slip downward even more rapidly than usual. The new chip requires a new Palm OS to accommodate it: Palm OS 3.1. The changes are invisible to you; they don't offer any new features. (You can't install this new OS on any previous model, not that it would do you any good.) Unfortunately, several dozen popular Palm programs proved to have incompatibilities with the new OS. Because software authors generally scramble to solve such problems, use the Web links on this book's CD to check for updates of any programs that seem to cause problems for your your Palm IIIx or Palm V. <heading2> Palm IIIx The Palm IIIx looks and works almost exactly like its older brother, the Palm III. But it offers a few bonuses: Much clearer screen The new screen technology, made possible by a new, ultra-thin 3M film placed behind the display, makes the background lighter gray-green and the images much crisper. 4MB memory Enough for 40,000 names, notes, dates, and so on. A more rugged design For example, the memory module inside is no longer a separate card that can come loose. Instead, memory is fastened directly to the main circuit board. An interior slot Moving the memory module onto the main circuit board means that an available slot remains on the circuit board. You could conceivably filled the slot with still more memory -- or add-on circuitry not even imagined yet. Free HotSync extras The Palm IIIx package includes the Network HotSync software (described in Chapter 6, HotSync Step by Step) and a software module that lets you HotSync with Microsoft Outlook for Windows. Both were once extra-cost options. It now reads: Fourth Generation: Palm IIIx, IIIe, and Palm V Two new models debuted in February 1999: the Palm IIIx and Palm V; their low-cost sibling, the IIIe, arrived a few months later. Aside from the physical characteristics described below, one of the most important internal changes was the introduction of a new processor-- the Motorola Dragonball EZ (instead of the traditional Dragonball). While similar to its predecessor in many ways, this chip accepts less expensive memory modules, which means that these models' list prices may slip downward even more rapidly than usual. The accompanying new Palm OS, version 3.1, offers chip compatibility, but no new features. (You can't install this new OS on any previous model, not that it would do you any good.) A few popular Palm programs proved to have incompatibilities with the new OS. Because software authors generally scramble to solve such problems, use the Web links on this book's CD to check for updates of any programs that seem to cause problems for your late-model Palm. <heading 2> Palm IIIx, Palm IIIe The Palm IIIx and IIIe look and work almost exactly like their older brother, the Palm III. But they offer a few bonuses: Much clearer screen The new screen technology, made possible by a new, ultra-thin 3M film placed behind the display, makes the background lighter gray-green and the images much crisper. 4MB memory (Palm IIIx only) Enough for 40,000 names, notes, dates, and so on. A more rugged design For example, the memory module inside is no longer a separate card that can come loose. Instead, memory is fastened directly to the main circuit board. An interior slot (Palm IIIx only) Moving the memory module onto the main circuit board means that an available slot remains on the circuit board. You could conceivably filled the slot with still more memory -- or add-on circuitry not even imagined yet. Free HotSync extras (Palm IIIx only) The Palm IIIx package includes the Network HotSync software (described in Chapter 6, HotSync Step by Step) and a software module that lets you HotSync with Microsoft Outlook for Windows. Both were once extra-cost options.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
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Page 500
The text used to read

"4MB memory" It now reads: "4MB memory (Palm IIIx only)"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 500
The header used to read

"Palm V" It now reads: "Palm V, Palm Vx"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 501
The fifth and sixth paragraphs in the sidebar read

All you have to do is launch a program where you can do writing, such as the Memo Pad. Make the ShortCut symbol (which looks like a cursive lowercase L), make a period (tap twice), and write the number 8 (on the right side of the Graffiti area). You'll see the words [Normal Backlight] appear; you've succeeded in restoring the clearer illumination scheme to your palmtop. If you ever want to restore the default, inverted-image backlighting setting, repeat the ShortCut. This time, you'll see the words [Inverting Backlight], indicating that your ShortCut worked. They now read: All you have to do is launch a program where you can do writing, such as the Memo Pad. Make the ShortCut symbol (which looks like a cursive lowercase L), make a period (tap twice), and write the number 8 (on the right side of the Graffiti area). You'll see the words [Inverting Backlight] appear; you've succeeded in restoring the clearer illumination scheme to your palmtop. If you ever want to restore the default, inverted-image backlighting setting, repeat the ShortCut. This time, you'll see the words [Normal Backlight], indicating that your ShortCut worked.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 501
The paragraphs from:

"Fortunately, switching your palmtop..." through: "(Backlight dot command not working?)..." were removed and replaced with the following text: "Fortunately, switching your palmtop back to the old, much clearer backlighting system takes only one second and costs nothing. It requires the use of a dot command, such as those described in Chapter 17. Just launch a program where you can write, such as the Memo Pad. Make the ShortCut symbol (which looks like a cursive lowercase L), make a period (tap twice), and write the number 8 (on the right side of the Graffiti area). You'll see the words [Normal Backlight] appear; you've succeeded in restoring the clearer illumination scheme to your palmtop. Repeat the process to restore the original effect. If that process doesn't work, just download LightHack from www.palmcentral.com; it does the same thing without all the trouble."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 502
The text used to read

"For some PalmPiloteers, the Palm V..." It now reads: "For some PalmPiloteers, the 2MB Palm V (and the 8MB Palm Vx)..."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 502
The text used to read

"History tells us, however, that the legions of Palm engineers won't take long to offer those products in Palm V format--or to design an adapter." It now reads: "The legions of Palm engineers didn't take long, however, to work around that drawback. The GoType keyboard was quickly released in a V-compatable version, for example, and the $35 PalmDock V adapter (www.solvepoint.com) should accommodate almost any other III-era gadget."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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The following text was added to the bottom of the page

"Sixth Generation: Palm IIIc, IIIxe "February 2000 brought two new models, each running Palm OS 3.5: the IIIxe (an 8 MB version of the IIIx), and the long-awaited color PalmPilot: the IIIc. The brightness and whiteness of the IIIc screen (indoors, anyway) are thrilling; the two-week battery charge is tolerable. The larger dimensions, however, hint that the IIIc will one day be regarded as an intermediate compromise step toward the ultimate PalmPilot: a color, wireless device the size of a Palm V. Now that's a generation worth waiting for."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Middle of the page

including Palm Desktop 2.1. now reads: including Palm Desktop 2.5.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 582
Cut index entry "Guess Me program" and added

Handspring Visor, 19, 498

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 583
The page did read

IntelliSync program, 164-166 It now reads: IntelliSync program, 164-166, 567

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2000
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Page 585

Removed page number 19 from the "MenuHack program" listing.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 587
The index entry

Palm III Converter Pro program, 510 has been replaced with: Palm IIIe, 18-19, 499-501

Anonymous    Aug 01, 1999
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Page 587
The index entry

"PalmIII Color Pack" was replaced with: "Palm IIIc, 17, 502"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 587
The index entry used to read

"Palm IIIx, 15, 499-501" It now reads: "Palm IIIx and IIIxe, 15, 499-501"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 588
The index entry used to read

"Palm V, 15, 499-503" It now reads: "Palm V and Vx, 15, 499-503"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
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Page 590

Removed "dating" from the "records" entry.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 595

Cut index entry "TransAOL program" and added TRGPro palmtop, 198

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999
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Page 596

Cut index entry "Visa credit card PQA" and added Visor (Handspring), 19, 498

Anonymous    Dec 01, 1999