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Basic Helicopter Aerodynamics, 3rd Edition by Simon Newman, John M. Seddon

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Chapter 7

Performance

7.1 Introduction

The preceding chapters have been mostly concerned with establishing the aerodynamic characteristics of the helicopter main rotor. We turn now to considerations of the helicopter as a total vehicle. The assessment of helicopter performance, like that of a fixed-wing aircraft, is at bottom a matter of comparing the power required with that available, in order to determine whether a particular flight task is feasible. The number of different performance calculations that can be made for a particular aircraft is of course unlimited, but aircraft specification sets the scene in allowing meaningful limits to be prescribed. A typical specification for a new or updated helicopter might contain the following requirements, exclusive of emergency operations such as personnel rescue and life saving:

  • Prescribed missions, such as a hover role, a payload/range task or a patrol/loiter task. More than one are likely to be called for. A mission specification leads to a weight determination for payload plus fuel and thence to an all-up weight, in the standard fashion illustrated in Figure 7.1.
  • Some specific atmosphere-related requirements, for example the ability to perform the mission at standard (ISA) temperature plus, say, 15°; the ability to perform a reduced mission at altitude; the ability to fly at a particular cruise speed.
  • Specified safety requirements to allow for an engine failure.
  • Specified environmental operating conditions, such as to and from ...

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