Proof 1
Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 137
Proof 1
Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 137
Drawing Lessons_126_143_11803.indd 137 16/2/17 3:54 PM
TextText
What Makes a
Glamour Girl?, 1939
Illustration for
If Love I Must by
Katharine Newlin Burt
Ladies’ Home Journal,
July 1939
Oil on board
sketch before doing a color composition,” Parker wrote. “I use it as a
guide to keep the colors in their proper values.
On the opposite page, Parker has narrowed down his palette
even further. The large expanse of white, which serves to focus our
attention on the face of the recumbent woman, is surrounded by a
cool array of blues and greens. A few touches of red and yellow keep
the color scheme from being too monotonous and connect the three
women in the scene.
137
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Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 137
Proof 1
Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 137
Drawing Lessons_126_143_11803.indd 137 16/2/17 3:54 PM
Proof 1
Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 138
Proof 1
Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 138
Drawing Lessons_126_143_11803.indd 138 16/2/17 3:54 PM
TextText
Whitcomb faced a dicult challenge when creating the story
illustration, below, featuring a hooded woman glancing out at the
viewer— the image would be printed on two pages, but only the
right-hand segment would be published in full color. The left-hand
page would be printed in two colors, black and red. The artist came
up with a solution that allowed him to spread the figure over both
pages while still operating within these color requirements. In his
final painting, only the black scarf appears on both pages, with all
other variations to the right. To heighten the dramatic eect, Whit-
comb used a mostly red and black color scheme, with just a touch of
the complementary color, green, as a highlight under the girl’s chin.
He established the black scarf as the darkest value and the woman’s
eyes and earrings as the lightest, with midtones distributed
throughout the composition accordingly.
(All images on this spread)
Jon Whitcomb
The Affair, 1948
Study for The Affair
by Elise Jerard,
Cosmopolitan, July 1948
Gouache on board
Of his color choices in
this illustration study,
Whitcomb wrote
“Rendering colors for
night scenes involves
considerable lying,
especially in scenes like
this, in which moonlight
ostensibly provides the
only illumination. Actually,
only pale blues are visible
under such conditions.”
Whitcomb added the
other colors to fulfill what
the viewer would expect
to see.
Man and Woman
in Mountain Scene
Gouache on board
In this scene, Whitcomb
said of the girl’s attire,
“I gave her a yellow
sweater, a yellow hood,
and a yellow skirt, which
. . . made a horizontal
contrast to the vertical
feeling I wanted to give
the mountains.”
(
Below)
The Girl with the
Nasturtium Red Hair
Gouache on board
138
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Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 138
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Job: 11803 Title: #218076# Drawing Lessons From The Famous Artists School (Rockport)
DTP: GLP Page: 138
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