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Learning the UNIX Operating System, Fourth Edition by Jerry Peek, John Strang, Grace Todino

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Starting X

There are several ways to start X and its window manager. This section explains a few of the most common ways. Figure 2.2 shows some steps along a few different paths to starting X. If your display is like any of the following, refer to the section noted. (If none of these fits your situation, skim through the next three sections or ask your system administrator for help.)

  • Figure 2.2A, xdm is running. Start with Section A.

  • Figure 2.2B, you have a standard UNIX login session. Start with Section B.

  • Figure 2.2C, X is running but a window manager probably isn’t. (You can tell because the window doesn’t have a “frame” around it.) Read Section C.

  • Figure 2.2D, the window has a frame, so X and the window manager (in this example, mwm) are running. You can skip ahead to the next main section, Section 2.3

Some possibilities

Figure 2-2. Some possibilities

A. Ready to Run X (with xdm)

Some terminals, like the one shown in Figure 2.2A, are probably ready to use X. Your terminal has probably been set up to use xdm, the X display manager; xdm logs you in to your UNIX host and (usually) starts the window manager.

When you start, there’s a single window in the middle of the screen that says something like “X Window System on hostname.” The window has two prompts, “Login:” and “Password:”. A cursor (a vertical bar) sits to the right of the “Login:” line. Type your username (login name) and press RETURN ...

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