O'Reilly logo

Reverse Mortgages and Linked Securities: The Complete Guide to Risk, Pricing, and Regulation by Vishaal Bhuyan

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

APPENDIX B
Reverse Mortgage Analytics
Olivia S. Mitchell Insurance & Risk Management, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
 
John Piggott School of Economics, University of New South Wales
 
 
 
 
At a general level, all reverse mortgage offerings that are self-financing must be priced so that the lending institution can expect to make back the money loaned plus interest over the term of the contract, after pooling risks across the set of loans sold. Here we provide an analysis of the lump-sum and annuity options for the reverse annuity product.
A simplified model of the loan amount can be specified by supposing a single borrower took out a loan in the form of a lump sum (LS) using his future home value as collateral. Then in a competitive market, the actuarially fair amount he could borrow would be set so the loan balance would equal in present value the anticipated value of the house at the time of sale. This may be defined as follows:
(B.1)
054
where r = expected future riskless rate of return, g = additional risk premium expected on housing investment above the riskless rate, m = additional risk premium expected on mortgage loans above the riskless rate, HEQ = home equity amount at the time the loan is taken out, tp = proba bility of survival t periods from age x, maxAge = oldest possible survival age from life table (e.g., 110).
The lump sum (LS) simply grows at the mortgage ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required