O'Reilly logo

The New How by Nilofer Merchant

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Notes

Introduction: Why Strategies Fail

[3]

Chapter 1

[4]

[5]

Chapter 2

[6]

[7]

Chapter 3

[8]

[9]

[10]

[11]

Chapter 5

[12]

[13]

[14]

Chapter 6

[15]

[16]

Chapter 8

[17]

[18]

[19]

[20]

Appendix A

[21]

[22]



[4] Dan Ariely’s book Predictably Irrational (HarperCollins) says we spend too much time and energy keeping our options open. We’d be better off narrowing sooner.

[6] Tim O’Reilly (who founded O’Reilly Media, coined the term Web 2.0, and is the publisher of this book) has great wisdom on this: create more value than you capture. I agree that’s a great principle, because it creates personal satisfaction, and I believe the money follows passion.

[7] Stimson, William R. “How to Move a Tree,” Ode, April 2008.

[8] Kaplan, Robert S. and David P. Norton. The Strategy-Focused Organization. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press (2000).

[9] TED (Technology, Entertainment, and Design) is a thought-leadership conference with a focus on ideas that will change the world. The talks are posted on http://www.ted.com/ so ideas worth spreading can be seen by everyone.

[11] Schwartz, Barry. “The Tyranny of Choice.” Scientific American Mind (December 2004).

[12] If you would like more information on brainstorming or creative idea generation, check Appendix A for some resources.

[13] For specific information about brainstorming creative options in inclusive and complete ways, see the exercise called “Generating Options” in Appendix A.

[14] Edward de Bono has some good approaches on how to do this, so check Appendix B for more information.

[15] According to a McKinsey Global Survey (McKinsey Quarterly, April 2008), most companies assess three or fewer options and look forward no more than two years when responding to a competitor’s move. A significant number rely on intuition, and the most frequent response is the choice that is most obvious at the moment the decision is made, for example, answering a price cut with a price cut. Perhaps most alarming, if faced with the same situation again, 60% of executives would respond with the same or even less analysis.

[16] Source: Video of Jonathan Rosenberg at Claremont McKenna College on March 19, 2008.

[18] Or perhaps “#%!&@!!”, depending on the price of the mistake!

[20] If you’re getting everything right the first time, chances are, you’re being very conservative and missing upside opportunities.

[21] FedEx came from a version of Exercise #3. Fred Smith applied the hub-and-spoke idea from the telecommunications and banking industries to his logistics and transportation business.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required