Enabling SOA Using WebSphere Messaging

Book description

Successfully implementing a service-oriented architecture (SOA) requires applications and infrastructure that can support the SOA principles. Applications can be enabled by creating service interfaces to existing or new functions hosted by the applications. The service interfaces should be accessed using an infrastructure that can route and transport service requests to the correct service provider. As organizations expose more and more functions as services, it is vitally important that this infrastructure supports the management of SOA on an enterprise scale.

This IBM Redbooks publication looks at how IBM messaging products support an SOA environment. In particular, it looks at WebSphere Application Server, WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus, WebSphere MQ, and WebSphere Message Broker in an SOA environment. We discuss how they support SOA, compare the potential ESB product implementations, and show examples of building the infrastructure and creating mediations.

Table of contents

  1. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  2. Preface
    1. The team that wrote this redbook
    2. Become a published author
    3. Comments welcome
  3. Chapter 1: Introduction
    1. SOA overview
      1. The driver for SOA
      2. Architectural approach
      3. Design principles
    2. SOA and messaging
    3. Using an enterprise service bus
    4. The IBM SOA Foundation
      1. SOA life cycle
      2. SOA Reference Architecture
    5. For more information
  4. Chapter 2: Product selection
    1. IBM SOA Foundation products for messaging
    2. WebSphere Application Server (1/2)
    3. WebSphere Application Server (2/2)
    4. WebSphere MQ
    5. WebSphere ESB
      1. Mediation functions in WebSphere ESB versus WebSphere Application Server
    6. WebSphere Message Broker
    7. ESB product comparison
    8. WebSphere Process Server
  5. Chapter 3: Runtime topology selection
    1. Getting started
      1. Starting with simple messaging connections
      2. Adding an ESB for enhanced connectivity
      3. Adding a business process engine for service orchestration
    2. Advanced topologies
      1. WebSphere MQ
      2. WebSphere Message Broker
      3. WebSphere ESB and WebSphere Process Server
      4. Application server and queue manager cluster
    3. End-to-end scenario
  6. Chapter 4: Application design
    1. Introduction to messaging
    2. Messaging models
      1. Point-to-point
      2. Publish-subscribe
      3. Point-to-point versus publish-subscribe
    3. Messaging styles
      1. Asynchronous communication
      2. Pseudo-synchronous communication
    4. Messaging patterns
      1. Fire-and-forget
      2. Request-reply
      3. Selecting a messaging pattern
    5. Messaging application design
      1. Application design in general
      2. Message consumers
      3. Message producers
      4. Message producer and consumer in combination
    6. Designing a messaging-based SOA
      1. SOA approach
      2. Service identification
      3. Service specification
      4. Service realization
      5. Design considerations (1/3)
      6. Design considerations (2/3)
      7. Design considerations (3/3)
    7. For more information
  7. Chapter 5: Point-to-point runtime configuration
    1. WebSphere MQ configuration
      1. Create the queue managers
      2. Create a remote queue definition
      3. Create a transmission queue
      4. Create a sender channel
      5. Create a local queue
      6. Create a receiver channel
      7. Start the sender channel
      8. Test the connection
    2. Connect WebSphere ESB to WebSphere MQ
      1. Configure the service integration bus (1/2)
      2. Configure the service integration bus (2/2)
      3. Configure WebSphere MQ
      4. Start the connection
      5. Test the connection
    3. Configuring a queue sharing group
      1. Set up the DB2 environment to support MQ shared queue
      2. Set up the CFRM policy with the MQ structures
      3. Add the MQ data sharing group entry to the DB2 table
      4. Update the ZPARM
      5. Update the queue manager procedures
      6. Define the shared queues between the two MQ subsystems
      7. Starting WebSphere MQ (1/2)
      8. Starting WebSphere MQ (2/2)
      9. For more information
  8. Chapter 6: Integration scenarios with WebSphere ESB
    1. Using WebSphere ESB
      1. Developing mediations
      2. Deploying mediations
    2. Integration scenario
    3. XML-to-XML mapping using a mediation flow
      1. Mediation overview
    4. XML-to-XML transformation using XSLT mapping
      1. Create the mediation module
      2. Create the business objects
      3. Build the interfaces
      4. Build the mediation module (1/2)
      5. Build the mediation module (2/2)
      6. Bind the export and import nodes to JMS
      7. Prepare the runtime (1/2)
      8. Prepare the runtime (2/2)
  9. Chapter 7: Integration scenarios with WebSphere Message Broker
    1. Using WebSphere Message Broker
      1. Message flow development
      2. Message flow deployment and broker administration
      3. Sample message flow
    2. Integration scenarios
    3. XML-to-XML mapping using a Mapping node
      1. Create the message sets containing the XML DTD files
      2. Create the message flow
      3. Deploy the message flow to the broker
      4. Create the WebSphere MQ queues
      5. Test the message flow
      6. Using JMS nodes (1/2)
      7. Using JMS nodes (2/2)
    4. XML-to-XML transformation using XSLT
      1. Create the message sets
      2. Create the mapping
      3. Create the message flow
      4. Create the WebSphere MQ queues
      5. Deploy and test the message flow
    5. XML-to-COBOL mapping
      1. Create the message sets
      2. Create the message flow
      3. Create the WebSphere MQ queues
      4. Test the message flow
    6. Routing messages
      1. Create the message flow
      2. Define the filters
      3. Create the WebSphere MQ queues
      4. Deploy and test the message flow
  10. Appendix A: Sample files
    1. Sample XML files
    2. Sample DTD files
  11. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. How to get IBM Redbooks
    5. Help from IBM
  12. Index (1/2)
  13. Index (2/2)
  14. Back cover

Product information

  • Title: Enabling SOA Using WebSphere Messaging
  • Author(s): Carla Sadtler, Philipp Huber, SangMin Yi
  • Release date: March 2006
  • Publisher(s): IBM Redbooks
  • ISBN: None