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Enterprise JavaBeans, Third Edition by Richard Monson-Haefel

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Fitting the Pieces Together

To illustrate how a J2EE platform would be used, imagine using a J2EE server in Titan’s reservation system. To build this system, we would use the TravelAgent, Cabin, ProcessPayment, Customer, and other enterprise beans we defined in this book, along with web components that would provide an HTML interface.

The web components would access the enterprise beans in the same way that any Java client would, by using the enterprise beans’ remote and home interfaces. The web components would generate HTML to represent the reservation system.

Figure 17-5 shows a web page generated by a servlet or JSP page for the Titan reservation system. This web page was generated by web components on the J2EE server. At this point, the person using the reservation system has been guided through a login page, a customer selection page, and a cruise selection page and is about to choose an available cabin for the reservation.

HTML interface to the Titan reservation system

Figure 17-5. HTML interface to the Titan reservation system

The list of available cabins was obtained from the TravelAgent EJB, whose listAvailableCabins() method was invoked by the servlet that generated the web page. The list of cabins was used to create an HTML list box in a web page that was loaded into the user’s browser. When the user chooses a cabin and submits the selection, an HTTP request is sent to the J2EE server. The J2EE server receives the request ...

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