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JavaServer Faces by Hans Bergsten

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More Modular User Interface Code

The web application architecture most experienced developers recommend is loosely based on the Model-View-Controller (MVC) design pattern. MVC was first described by Xerox in a number of papers published in the late 1980s, in conjunction with the Smalltalk language. This model has since been used for GUI applications developed in all popular programming languages. The basic idea is to separate the application data and business logic, the presentation of the data, and the interaction with the data into distinct entities labeled the Model, the View, and the Controller, respectively.

The Model represents pure business data and the rules for how to use this data; it knows nothing about how the data is displayed or the user interface controls used to modify the data. The View, on the other hand, knows all about the user interface details. It also knows about the public Model interface for reading its data, so that it can render it correctly, and it knows about the Controller interface, so it can ask the Controller to modify the Model. Using the MVC design pattern results in a flexible application in which multiple presentations (Views) can be provided and easily modified, and changes in the business rules or physical representation of the data (the Model) can be made without touching any of the user interface code.

While Java web application frameworks like Struts support the MVC model on a high level, it’s not supported in the same strict, fine-granular ...

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