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Visual Studio 2013 Cookbook by Richard Banks, Jeff Martin

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Using asynchrony with web applications

Internet Information Server (IIS) has limits on the number of requests and I/O threads it can use. Blocking any of these threads means IIS is forced to wait until the thread is released before another request can be processed. When there are no threads available to process requests (because of blocking or a high-server load), requests start to queue up, and over time, that queue can grow until it reaches its maximum size, at which point the dreaded 503 Service Unavailable message will be displayed to the visitors on your site. This is not really what you want.

Historically, developers may have overlooked the benefits of using an asynchronous design when it came to web application design. This oversight may ...

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