CHAPTER 5

DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION SECURITY

Raymond Panko

5.1 INTRODUCTION

5.2 SAMPLING OF NETWORKS

5.2.1 Simple Home Network

5.2.2 Building LAN

5.2.3 Firm's Wide Area Networks (WANs)

5.2.4 Internet

5.2.5 Applications

5.3 NETWORK PROTOCOLS AND VULNERABILITIES

5.4 STANDARDS

5.4.1 Core Layers

5.4.2 Layered Standards Architectures

5.4.3 Single-Network Standards

5.4.4 Internetworking Standards

5.5 INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)

5.5.1 IP Version 4 Packet

5.5.2 IP Version 6

5.5.3 IPsec

5.6 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL (TCP)

5.6.1 Connection-Oriented and Reliable Protocol

5.6.2 Reliability

5.6.3 Flag Fields

5.6.4 Octets and Sequence Number

5.6.5 Acknowledgment Numbers

5.6.6 Window Field

5.6.7 Options

5.6.8 Port Numbers

5.6.9 TCP Security

5.7 USER DATAGRAM PROTOCOL

5.8 TCP/IP SUPERVISORY STANDARDS

5.8.1 Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)

5.8.2 Domain Name System (DNS)

5.8.3 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

5.8.4 Dynamic Routing Protocols

5.8.5 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

5.9 APPLICATION STANDARDS

5.9.1 HTTP and HTML

5.9.2 E-Mail

5.9.3 Telnet, FTP, and SSH

5.9.4 Other Application Standards

5.10 CONCLUDING REMARKS

5.11 FURTHER READING

5.12 NOTES

5.1 INTRODUCTION.

Sometimes, an attacker can simply walk up to a target computer. In most cases, however, attackers must use networks to reach their targets. Some attacks even aim at networks, trying to bring down local area networks, wide area networks, and even the global Internet. This chapter provides an overview ...

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