CHAPTER 43

ETHICAL DECISION MAKING AND HIGH TECHNOLOGY

James Landon Linderman

43.1 INTRODUCTION: THE ABCs OF COMPUTER ETHICS

43.1.1 Why an Ethics Chapter in a Computer Security Handbook?

43.1.2 How Much Time Do You Have for This Chapter?

43.2 AWARENESS

43.2.1 Principle 1: Ethics Counts

43.2.2 Principle 2: Ethics Is Everybody's Business

43.2.3 A Test: Put Yourself in Another's Shoes

43.2.4 An Approach: Disclose!

43.3 BASICS

43.3.1 Principle 3: Stakeholders Dictate Ethics

43.3.2 Principle 4: Traditional Principles Still Apply

43.3.3 More Tests

43.3.4 A Guideline Approach: Ask!

43.3.5 Another Guideline Approach: An Ethics Officer

43.4 CONSIDERATIONS

43.4.1 Principle 5: Ethics Need Not and Should Not Be a Hassle

43.4.2 Principle 6: Ethics Policies Deserve Formality

43.4.3 Principle 7: Ethics Policies Deserve Review

43.4.4 Principle 8: Anticipate

43.4.5 The Smell Test

43.4.6 An Approach: Stock Taking

43.5 CONCLUDING REMARKS

43.5.1 How to Keep Up

43.5.2 Why to Keep Up

43.6 FURTHER READING

43.1 INTRODUCTION: THE ABCs OF COMPUTER ETHICS

43.1.1 Why an Ethics Chapter in a Computer Security Handbook?

In an information age, many potential misuses and abuses of information create privacy and security problems. In addition to possible legal issues, ethical issues affect many groups and individuals—including employees and customers, vendors, consultants, bankers, and stockholders—who have enough at stake in the matter to confront and even destroy an organization over ethical lapses. As is so ...

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