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Continuous Integration, Delivery, and Deployment by Sander Rossel

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E2E testing

Now that we have our .NET Core application running, we can add our Selenium tests to our Jenkins build. Ensure that you add them after you have deployed the software. Speaking of which, it may be worth it to deploy a version of your software before everything is minified, uglified, and bundled to some local company server, and run your tests on that environment as well. It will be a lot easier to debug any problems, and the setup can more closely match your ultimate production environment than your local development machine does.

To fix our Selenium tests, we first have to make some minor code changes. Unfortunately, .NET Core unit test projects are a little more limited than MVC Core projects, so we do not have any app settings ...

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