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Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell by Jason McIntosh, Chuck Toporek, Chris Stone, Andy Lester

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Chapter 11. Running Network Services

A network service is a program running on a local machine that other machines can connect to and use over a network. Common examples include web, email, and file-transfer servers.

This chapter describes how network services work in general, and how several of the more popular services work on Mac OS X.

Network Services Overview

Generally, a network service operates through a daemon program that listens for incoming connections on a certain port; web servers usually listen on port 80, for example, and ssh connections typically happen on port 22. (The precise way it accomplishes this is implementation-specific; it might choose to handle the whole connection itself or fork off another process to handle it so the daemon can get back to listening.)

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