Chapter 3. The 31.5-Minute Project Manager

THERE ARE MANY INPUTS, outputs, and tools and techniques described in the PMBOK that offer an extensive list of elements that need to be considered when implementing anything—for example, the section on Risk Monitoring and Control offers the grid of gozintas (inputs), gozoutas (outputs), and the tools and techniques shown in Figure 3.1.

Certainly all these elements in some ways are needed, but the reader must remember that there is a rather remarkable disclaimer on page 39 of the 2004 PMBOK that states:

However, just as not all the processes will be needed on all projects, not all of the interactions will apply to all projects or phases.[8]

No attention is really drawn to this statement, but it carries a lot of weight. The subtext here is that this framework is still a thinking process that requires evaluation for your particular situation. Blindly following every input, output, and tool and technique in the Guide will invariably get you into trouble. An engineer will not take everything learned in four years of engineering school and apply it blindly to every engineering problem or design. It's a toolbox, not a methodology. Learn how to use the tools and when to apply them correctly and you will keep your project and your sanity intact.

Source:A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 3rd ed. Project Management Institute, 2004.

Figure 3.1. Source:A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 3rd ed. Project Management Institute, ...

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