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Understanding the Linux Kernel, 3rd Edition by Marco Cesati, Daniel P. Bovet

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Chapter 14. Block Device Drivers

This chapter deals with I/O drivers for block devices, i.e., for disks of every kind. The key aspect of a block device is the disparity between the time taken by the CPU and buses to read or write data and the speed of the disk hardware. Block devices have very high average access times. Each operation requires several milliseconds to complete, mainly because the disk controller must move the heads on the disk surface to reach the exact position where the data is recorded. However, when the heads are correctly placed, data transfer can be sustained at rates of tens of megabytes per second.

The organization of Linux block device handlers is quite involved. We won't be able to discuss in detail all the functions that are included in the block I/O subsystem of the kernel; however, we'll outline the general software architecture. As in the previous chapter, our objective is to explain how Linux supports the implementation of block device drivers , rather than showing how to implement one of them.

We start in the first section "Block Devices Handling" to explain the general architecture of the Linux block I/O subsystem. In the sections "The Generic Block Layer," "The I/O Scheduler," and "Block Device Drivers," we will describe the main components of the block I/O subsystem. Finally, in the last section, "Opening a Block Device File," we will outline the steps performed by the kernel when opening a block device file.

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