O'Reilly logo

Algebra II Workbook For Dummies, 2nd Edition by Mary Jane Sterling

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 5

Formulating Functions

In This Chapter

arrow Determining how much functions are worth

arrow Checking the restrictions on input and output: Domain and range

arrow Defining functions by their characteristics

arrow Performing operations on functions

arrow Looking at and creating inverse functions

A function is a very special type of relationship in mathematics. Functions are those relationships between input values and output values that guarantee that you’ll never get more than one output for any input. For example, the equation y = 8x + 2x2 – 3x is a function, because when you plug in any value for x, such as 2, you get only one value for y; in this case, y = 15. This characteristic of having just one value when you put a number into a function is essential when you’re dealing with functions that model the cost of production or the number of amoebas in a culture. You don’t want to be saying, “Well, there are either 16 or 16,000,000 amoebas in that dish.” You’d prefer just one answer when you use the formula. ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required