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Learning C# by Jesse Liberty

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Relational Operators

Relational operators compare two values and then return a Boolean value (true or false). The greater-than operator (>), for example, returns true if the value on the left of the operator is greater than the value on the right. Thus, 5>2 returns the value true, while 2>5 returns the value false.

The relational operators for C# are shown in Table 7-1. This table assumes two variables: bigValue and smallValue, in which bigValue has been assigned the value 100 and smallValue the value 50.

Table 7-1. C# relational operators (assumes bigValue = 100 and smallValue = 50)

Name

Operator

Given this statement

The expression evaluates to

Equals

==

bigValue == 100

bigValue == 80

True

False

Not Equals

!=

bigValue != 100

bigValue != 80

False

True

Greater than

>

bigValue > smallValue

True

Greater than or equal to

>=

bigValue >= smallValue

smallValue >= bigValue

True

False

Less than

<

bigValue < smallValue

False

Less than or equal to

<=

smallValue <= bigValue

bigValue <= smallValue

True

False

Each of these relational operators acts as you might expect. Notice that most of these operators are composed of two characters. For example, the greater than or equal to operator (>=) is created with the greater than symbol (>) and the equal sign (=). Notice also that the equals operator is created with two equal signs (==) because the single equal sign alone (=) is reserved for the assignment operator. ...

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