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Podcasting For Dummies, 3rd Edition by Chuck Tomasi, Tee Morris

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Chapter 13

Speaking Directly to Your Peeps

IN THIS CHAPTER

check Encouraging listener feedback

check Starting a discussion group online

check Finding conversations on the web

check Handling listener feedback, good and bad

Communication can be defined in a multitude of overly complex ways. For the sake of argument (and not to copy each and every dictionary entry we can find), we define the term this way:

The exchange of information between two points.

Note that last part — between two points. To us, this implies a bidirectional flow of information, to and from both parties.

If you've had the pleasure (note how well we can say that with a straight face) of attending any productivity or team-building seminars, the presenters really drive the message home: Effective communication is not a one-way street.

Over the past few years, podcasting has evolved as a more effective communication than traditional media (such as radio or television). We all have the same tools to communicate at our disposal — email, websites, phone lines — so why do podcast listeners seem to get more involved with podcasting? Two simple ...

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