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SQL: Visual QuickStart Guide by Chris Fehily

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Chapter 2. The Relational Model

Many good books about database design are available; this book isn’t one of them. Nevertheless, to become an effective SQL programmer, you’ll need to become familiar with the relational model (Figure 2.1), a data model so appealingly simple and well-suited for organizing and managing data that it squashed the competing network and hierarchical models with a satisfying Darwinian crunch.

Figure 2.1. You can read E.F. Codd’s A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks (Communications of the ACM, Vol. 13, No. 6, June 1970, pp. 377-387) at www.acm.org/classics/nov95/toc.html. Relational databases are based on the data model defined by this paper.

The foundation of the relational model, mathematical ...

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