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Strategies to the Prediction, Mitigation and Management of Product Obsolescence by Michael G. Pecht, Peter Sandborn, Ulrich Ermel, Bjoern Bartels

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8.5 PRODUCT OBSOLESCENCE AND AFTERSALES

All products reach discontinuance as some point in time. Once the proactive obsolescence management board makes the decision to obsolete an electronic assembly, there are certain rules an organization should follow. Customer notification is a clear must. For the correct on-time notifications, please refer to Chapter 2. For a quick reference, customers should be informed about one year in advance. It depends upon the product, but it might be reasonable to change the part number in order to avoid future confusion. Obsolescence does not necessarily mean that there will be no future demand. Therefore, all technical data should be stored in a safe place. Maybe the service department will need access to the data sometime in the future. Another possibility is to sell the document to customers or other organizations that could use it for system sustainment. Some semiconductor manufacturers sell off everything related to an obsolete part. The aftermarket suppliers may purchase the information from the semiconductor manufacturers in some cases.

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