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How Secure Is Your Wireless Network? Safeguarding Your Wi-Fi LAN by CCNA Lee Barken - CISSP MCP, CPA

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Summary

In this chapter, we reviewed 802.11i, WPA, TKIP, and AES. By late 2002, the Wi-Fi Alliance sensed that the market needed security solutions right away and didn't want to wait for the final 802.11i specification. Studies showed that the number one reason why enterprises were delaying wireless implementations was security. Therefore, the Wi-Fi Alliance announced WPA.

WPA was an interim measure, which took some pieces of 802.11i that were ready for prime time, and left other pieces for the 802.11i working group to continue developing. The remaining parts of 802.11i (primarily the AES cipher and ad-hoc security) were not released until more than a year later. The best part of WPA was that it was backwards compatible with existing hardware ...

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