Using BGP Route Reflectors

Problem

You want to simplify your iBGP peer relationships by using route reflectors.

Solution

There are three types of configurations to consider when working with BGP Route Reflectors: the Route Reflector itself, the Client Peer, and the Nonclient Peer. In this example, which follows Figure 9-4, the Route Reflector is Router2, and it has two Client Peers—Router1 and Router3. It also has a Nonclient Peer, Router4.

The configurations for Client and Nonclient Peers contain no special commands. Router1 is the Client Peer:

Router1#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router1(config)#interface Ethernet0/0
Router1(config-if)#ip address 172.18.5.2 255.255.255.0
Router1(config-if)#exit
Router1(config)#interface Serial0/0
Router1(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.6 255.255.255.252
Router1(config-if)#exit
Router1(config)#interface Loopback0
Router1(config-if)#ip address 172.18.6.1 255.255.255.255
Router1(config-if)#exit
Router1(config)#router bgp 65500
Router1(config-router)#no synchronization
Router1(config-router)#neighbor 172.18.6.2 remote-as 65500
Router1(config-router)#neighbor 172.18.6.2 next-hop-self
Router1(config-router)#neighbor 172.18.6.2 update-source Loopback0
Router1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.5 remote-as 65510
Router1(config-router)#exit
Router1(config)#ip route 172.18.6.2 255.255.255.255 172.18.5.3
Router1(config)#ip route 172.18.6.3 255.255.255.255 172.18.5.4
Router1(config)#ip route 172.18.6.4 255.255.255.255 ...

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