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Linux Pocket Guide, 2nd Edition by Daniel J. Barrett

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cdrecord — stdin  stdout  - file  -- opt  --help  --version

Synopsis

cdrecord [options] tracks

The cdrecord command burns a writable CD, DVD, or Blu-ray disc. To burn the contents of a Linux directory onto a disc readable on Linux, Windows, and Macintosh systems:[14]

  1. Locate your disc writer’s device by running:

    $ cdrecord --scanbus
    ...
    0,0,0     0) *
    0,1,0     1) *
    0,2,0     2) *
    0,3,0     3) 'YAMAHA  ' 'CRW6416S  ' '1.0d' CD-ROM
    ...

    The device in this case is 0,3,0.

  2. Find out your CD writer’s speed for writing CD-R or CD-RW discs (whichever you’re using). Suppose it is a 6x writer of CD-Rs, so the speed is 6.

  3. Put the files you want to burn into a directory, say, dir. Arrange them exactly as you’d like them on the CD. The directory dir itself will not be copied to CD, just its contents.

  4. Burn the CD:

    $ DEVICE="0,3,0"
    $ SPEED=6
    $ mkisofs -R -l dir > mydisk.iso
    $ cdrecord -v dev=${DEVICE} speed=${SPEED} mydisk.iso

    or if your system is fast enough, you can do this with a single pipeline:

    $ mkisofs -R -l dir \
      | cdrecord -v dev=${DEVICE} speed=${SPEED} -

cdrecord can burn music CDs as well, but you might want to use a friendlier, graphical program like k3b instead (see Audio), which is built on top of cdrecord.

[14] Specifically, an ISO9660 CD with Rock Ridge extensions. mkisofs can create other formats for cdrecord to burn: see man mkisofs.

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