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Swing Hacks by Chris Adamson, Joshua Marinacci

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Turn the Spotlight on Swing #64
Chapter 8, Rendering
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321
HACK
paint( ) method of the component you want to see through the Java3D
scene is less efficient than taking a screen capture with the help of
java.awt.
Robot
; however, it is a lot easier because it works even when the
Canvas3D
has already been added to the window. This allows, for instance, changing
the texture when the window is resized and the gradient changes due to the
new dimensions.
Once the content panel has been fully drawn in
image, you must clip it to
retrieve the exact part covered by the
Canvas3D. This is done with another
BufferedImage
called
subImage
. This new picture has the same dimensions as
the 3D scene. The second step is to draw
image on subImage (without forget-
ting to change the origin of the drawing when you call
drawImage( )). When
the two last parameters of this method are both
0, the image is drawn on the
target surface with its top-left corner at the target’s top-left corner. With the
coordinates
c3d.getX( ) and c3d.getY( ), the pixel of image drawn at the
top-left corner of
subImage is the pixel where the Canvas3D is located on
screen. This ensures the code paints the exact part of the content panel that
lies behind the 3D scene.
Then, a
Background object is created with subImage as a texture. To achieve
this, you need to create an
ImageComponent2D from the BufferedImage—and
don’t forget to make the pixel formats compatible! Since
subImage has its
pixels stored as RGB integers, you must do the same for
ImageComponent2D. A
bounding sphere is finally attached to the background. Java3D uses this
sphere to know where the background object needs to be rendered and
where it should not be rendered. In this case, the background will appear
within a sphere of a radius of 100 units. This value is large enough to pre-
vent any rendering problem. Figure 8-11 shows the final result, with a
“transparent” 3D scene and no bugginess with pop-up menus.
—Romain Guy
H A C K
#64
Turn the Spotlight on Swing Hack #64
Users often get lost when using applications, as if they were in total
darkness. Why don’t you turn on a spotlight to show them the way?
Most applications involve a fair amount of data manipulation. The user cre-
ates, edits, deletes, and moves around data items. When the amount of data
becomes important, it is vital for the user to be able to search for items eas-
ily. Yet, search result displays are often irritatingly complicated, and the
results are a pain to browse through. This hack describes how to draw a
user’s attention to only the parts of the UI you want him to look at.

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