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Data Analysis with R - Second Edition by Tony Fischetti

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The binomial distribution

The binomial distribution is a fun one. Like our uniform distribution described in the previous section, it is discrete.

When an event has two possible outcomes, success or failure, this distribution describes the number of successes in a certain number of trials. Its parameters are n, the number of trials, and p, the probability of success.

Concretely, a binomial distribution with n=1 and p=0.5 describes the behavior of a single coin flip-if we choose to view heads as successes (we could also choose to view tails as successes). A binomial distribution with n=30 and p=0.5 describes the number of heads we should expect:

Figure 4.2: A binomial distribution (n=30, p=0.5)

On average, of course, we would expect to have ...

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