Chapter 10. Facilitating Workshops

Workshops are the key working format of service design. How can we keep them engaging, relevant, and productive?

Expert comments by: Arne van Oosterom | Arthur Yeh | Belina Raffy | Carola Verschoor | Ivan Boscariol | Renatus Hoogenraad

  1. 10.1 Key concepts of facilitation

    1. 10.1.1 Consent

    2. 10.1.2 Status

    3. 10.1.3 Neutrality

  2. 10.2 Styles and roles of facilitation

    1. 10.2.1 Adopting a role

    2. 10.2.2 Co-facilitation

    3. 10.2.3 Can a team member be a facilitator?

  3. 10.3 Success factors

    1. 10.3.1 Building the team

    2. 10.3.2 Purpose and expectations

    3. 10.3.3 Planning the work

    4. 10.3.4 Creating a safe space

    5. 10.3.5 Work modes in teams

  4. 10.4 Key facilitation techniques

    1. 10.4.1 Warm-ups

    2. 10.4.2 Timing

    3. 10.4.3 The room

    4. 10.4.4 Tools and props

    5. 10.4.5 Visualization

    6. 10.4.6 Post it or lose it: The expert’s guide to sticky notes

    7. 10.4.7 Space, distance, and positioning

    8. 10.4.8 Feedback

    9. 10.4.9 Changing status

    10. 10.4.10 Doing, not talking

    11. 10.4.11 Growing as a facilitator

  5. 10.5 Methods

      1. Three-brain warm-up

      2. Color-chain warm-up

      3. “Yes, and …” warm-up

      4. Red and green feedback

  6. 10.6 Cases

    1. 10.6.1 Case: The energizing power of the unfamiliar

    2. 10.6.2 Case: Pivot and focus

  1. This chapter also includes

    1. Safe space principles in practice

    2. The Status/Control Matrix

Why Facilitate?

“Co-creation” (more strictly, co-design) 1 makes great sense. In engaging a diverse group of participants in a multidisciplinary team, we encourage a rounded approach to a project, keep it rooted in reality, and boost the buy-in ...

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