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Head First 2D Geometry by Dawn Griffiths, Stray

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the intro
We know what youre thinking.
“How can this be a serious geometry book?”
“What’s with all the graphics?”
“Can I actually learn it this way?”
And we know what your
brain
is thinki
Your brain craves novelty. It’s always searching, scanning, waiting for
something unusual. It was built that way, and it helps you stay alive.
So what does your brain do with all the routine, ordinary, normal things
you encounter? Everything it can to stop them from interfering with
the brains real job—recording things that matter. It doesn’t bother
saving the boring things; they never make it past the “this is obviously
not important” filter.
How does your brain know what’s important? Suppose you’re out for
a day hike and a tiger jumps in front of you, what happens inside your
head and body?
Neurons fire. Emotions crank up. Chemicals surge.
And that’s how your brain knows.
This must be important! Don’t forget it!
But imagine you’re at home, or in a library. It’s a safe, warm,
tiger-free zone. You’re studying. Getting ready for an exam. Or
trying to learn some tough math thing that your teacher is going to
test you on tomorrow.
Just one problem. Your brain’s trying to do you a big favor. It’s trying
to make sure that this obviously non-important content doesn’t clutter
up scarce resources. Resources that are better spent storing the
really big things. Like tigers. Like the danger of fire. Like how you
should never again snowboard in shorts.
And there’s no simple way to tell your brain, “Hey brain, thank
you very much, but no matter how dull this book is, and how little
I’m registering on the emotional Richter scale right now, I really do
want you to keep this stuff around.”
Great. Only
330 more dull,
dry, boring pages.
ng.
Y
our brain thinks
THIS is imp
ortant.
Y
our brain thinks
THIS isn’t w
orth
saving.
you are here 4 xix
W
e t
hi
n
k of a “Head First” reade
r as a learner.
how to use this book
So wha
t does it tak
e to
learn
something
?
F
ir
st, y
ou hav
e to
get
it, then mak
e
sur
e y
ou don’
t
f
o
rget
it. It
s not a
bout pushing f
acts into y
our head. Based on the
la
test r
esear
c
h in cognitiv
e science
, neur
obiology
, and educa
tional psy
c
hology,
learning
tak
es a lot mor
e than te
xt on a pa
g
e. W
e know what turns y
our brain on.
Some of
the Head Fir
st lear
ning principles:
Mak
e it visual.
Images are far mor
e memor
able than w
or
ds alone
,
and make lear
ning much mor
e eff
ec
tiv
e (up t
o 89% impr
o
v
emen
t in
r
ecall and tr
ansf
er studies). I
t also makes things mor
e understandable
.
Put the w
or
ds within or near the g
r
a
phics
they r
ela
t
e t
o
,
r
a
ther than on the bott
om or on another page
,
and lear
ners will be up t
o
t
wic
e
as likely t
o
solv
e pr
oblems r
ela
t
ed t
o the c
on
t
en
t
.
Use a con
v
er
sa
tional and
per
sonaliz
ed style. I
n r
ec
en
t studies
,
studen
ts perf
or
med up t
o 40% bett
er on post
-lear
ning t
ests if the c
on
t
en
t spoke dir
ec
tly t
o
the r
eader, using a first-person, c
on
v
ersa
tional style r
a
ther than tak
ing a f
or
mal t
one
.
Tell
st
or
ies inst
ead of lectur
ing. U
se casual language
. D
on
t take y
ourself t
oo ser
iously
.
Which
would yo
u
pa
y mor
e a
tt
en
tion t
o: a stimula
ting dinner par
ty c
ompanion, or a lec
tur
e?
Get the lear
ner to think mor
e deepl
y
.
In other w
or
ds, unless y
ou ac
tiv
ely
fle
x y
our neur
ons
, nothing much happens in y
our head
. A r
eader has t
o be motiv
a
t
ed,
engaged
, cur
ious
, and inspir
ed t
o solv
e pr
oblems
, dr
a
w c
onclusions
, and genera
t
e
new k
nowledge
. A
nd f
or tha
t
, y
ou need challenges
, e
xer
cises, and thought
-pr
o
v
oking
questions
, and ac
tivities tha
t in
v
olv
e both sides
of the br
ain and multiple senses
.
Get—and keep—the r
eader’
s a
ttention.
W
e
v
e all had the
“I r
eally w
ant t
o lear
n this but I
can
t sta
y a
w
ake past page one”
e
xper
ienc
e
. Y
our br
ain pa
y
s a
tt
en
tion
t
o things tha
t ar
e out of the or
dinary
, in
t
er
esting
, str
ange
, ey
e
-
ca
t
ching
, une
xpec
t
ed. L
ear
ning a new, t
ough, t
echnical t
opic doesn
t
ha
v
e t
o be bor
ing. Y
our br
ain will lear
n much mor
e quickly if it
s not
.
T
ouc
h their emotions. W
e no
w k
now tha
t your abilit
y t
o
r
emember something is lar
gely dependen
t on its emotional c
on
t
en
t
.
Y
ou r
emember wha
t you car
e about
.
Y
ou r
emember when you
feel
something
.
No, w
e
r
e not talk
ing hear
t
-
wr
enching st
or
ies about a boy and his dog
.
W
e
r
e talk
ing
emotions like surpr
ise, cur
iosit
y
, fun,
wha
t the...?”
, and the f
eeling of
“I Rule!”
that c
omes when
y
ou solve a puzzle
, lear
n something ev
er
ybody else thinks is har
d, or r
ealiz
e you k
no
w something
that
“I
m mor
e t
echnical than thou
B
ob fr
om eng
ineer
ing
do
esn
t
.
OMG! Come check
out this email—this is
so cool!
xx intro

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