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iPod: The Missing Manual, 7th Edition by David Pogue, J.D. Biersdorfer

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What's in the Extras Menu

Here lie all the goodies that make the iPod more than just a music player:

  • Alarms. Have the iPod wake you up with a beep—or put you to sleep with a timer setting that lets you drift off to Dreamland with music.

  • Calendars. This menu holds a copy of your personal daily schedule from iCal or Microsoft Outlook.

  • Clocks. With its built-in clock and ability to display multiple different time zones, the iPod is probably the most stylish pocket watch you'll ever see.

  • Contacts. Any phone numbers and addresses you've ported over from your computer reside here.

  • Games. Test your capacity for trivia with iQuiz, kill time with a round of Klondike solitaire, or shoot things in the Vortex. Games from the iTunes Store, like Ms. Pac-Man and Sudoku, also land here.

  • Notes. The iPod has a built-in text reader program that you can use to read short documents and notes.

  • Screen Lock. With all your stuff that's nobody's business—address book, schedule, photos, etc.—you may want to password protect your 'Pod.

  • Stopwatch. The iPod can serve as your timer for keeping track of your overall workout or multiple laps around the track.

Check out Chapter 10 for more information on turning your iPod into a timekeeper, a handheld organizer, and more.

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Note

The Classic and the Nano show these menu items in a slightly different order. The Nano goes for the alphabetical approach listed in the text above.

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