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Juniper MX Series by Harry Reynolds, Douglas Richard Hanks Jr.

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Using Code Examples

This book is here to help you get your job done. In general, you may use the code in this book in your own configuration and documentation. You do not need to contact us for permission unless you’re reproducing a significant portion of the material. For example, deploying a network based on actual configurations from this book does not require permission. Selling or distributing a CD-ROM of examples from this book does require permission. Answering a question by citing this book and quoting example code does not require permission. Incorporating a significant amount of sample configurations or operational output from this book into your product’s documentation does require permission.

We appreciate, but do not require, attribution. An attribution usually includes the title, author, publisher, and ISBN, for example: “Juniper MX Series by Douglas Richard Hanks, Jr., and Harry Reynolds. Copyright 2012, Douglas Hanks, Jr., and Harry Reynolds, 978-1-449-31971-7.”

If you feel your use of code examples falls outside fair use or the permission given here, feel free to contact us at .

Warning

As with most deep-dive books, the reader will be exposed to a variety of hidden, Junos Shell, and even MPC-level VTY commands performed after forming an internal connection to a PFE component. As always, the standard disclaimers apply.

In general, a command being hidden indicates that the feature is not officially supported in that release. Such commands should only be used in production networks after consultation with JTAC. Likewise, the shell is not officially supported or documented. The commands available can change, and you can render a router unbootable with careless use of shell commands. The same holds true for PFE component-level shell commands, often called VTY commands, that, again, when undocumented, are capable of causing network disruption or damage to the routing platform that can render it inoperable.

The hidden and shell commands that are used in this book were selected because they were the only way to illustrate certain operational characteristics or the results of complex configuration parameters.

Again, hidden and shell commands should only be used under JTAC guidance; this is especially true when dealing with a router that is part of a production network.

You have been duly warned.

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