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Scrivener For Dummies by Gwen Hernandez

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Importing and Exporting with Footnotes

I cover importing and exporting (compiling) in Chapters 2 and 12, respectively, but here are several things to keep in mind when working with footnotes:

check.png To import a file that has footnotes into Scrivener, convert it to RTF format first. You can usually save a file in RTF format through a Save As command in your word processor.

check.png When compiling your manuscript for use in a word processor, the RTF format is the best at handling footnotes. Thus, you should compile to RTF format, even if you plan to open the manuscript in Word. After you open the file in Word, you can save it as a DOC file.

If you don’t want to use RTF, most formats retain the footnotes but convert them to endnotes.

check.png If you use a footnote marker for part of the manuscript, but then turn the marker setting off, the markers show up in the exported draft, alongside each footnote number.

To avoid this problem, you can move the link from the marker to a word in the text by using one of the following methods:

• Select the text in the Editor that you want to use as the new link, and then right-click the footnote in the Comments & Footnotes pane and choose Move to Selection from the pop-up ...

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