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Scrivener For Dummies by Gwen Hernandez

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Running Document Find and Replace

Document Find and Document Replace work much like Project Search and Project Replace, but they narrow the search to a single document or Scrivenings session. (Check out the sections “Working with Project Search” and “Using Project Replace,” both earlier in this chapter.)

Using Document Find

Document Find searches within the document(s) active in the Editor pane. It’s especially handy if you’ve done a Project Search and the document you’re looking at has a lot of highlighted results or is really long. Instead of scrolling through looking for highlights, you can perform a Document Find and have it step through the results one at a time.

Document Find even automatically loads the search string from the current Search text box in the toolbar. So you can run Project Search, select a document from the Results list, and then run Document Find to locate the text within that document.

Follow these steps to conduct a Document Find search:

1. Select the document(s) that you want to view in the Editor.

If you select multiple documents and they appear in the Corkboard or Outliner, choose View⇒Scrivenings to return to the Editor.

2. Choose EditFindFind.

Alternatively, you can press +F (Ctrl+F in Windows).

The Find window appears, as shown in Figure 17-6.

3. Type the word(s) that you want to search for in the Find text box.

If you’ve run a Project Search, the text box is prefilled from that search.

4. In the Find Options section, select Ignore Case ...

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