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A Practical Guide to Red Hat® Linux® 8 by Mark G. Sobell

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Chapter Summary

GNU/Linux has a hierarchical, or treelike, file structure that makes it possible to organize files so that you can find them quickly and easily. The file structure contains directory files and ordinary files. Directories contain other files, including other directories, whereas ordinary files generally contain text, programs, or images. The ancestor of all files is the root directory named /.

Most GNU/Linux filesystems support 255-character filenames. Nonetheless, it is a good idea to keep filenames simple and intuitive. Filename extensions can help make filenames more meaningful.

An absolute pathname starts with the root directory and contains all the filenames that trace a path to a given file. Such a pathname starts with a ...

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