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Emerging Areas in Bioengineering

Book Description

With more than 40 contributions from expert authors, this is an extensive overview of all important research topics in the field of bioengineering, including metabolic engineering, biotransformations and biomedical applications.

Alongside several chapters dealing with biotransformations and biocatalysis, a whole section is devoted to biofuels and the utilization of biomass. Current perspectives on synthetic biology and metabolic engineering approaches are presented, involving such example organisms as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum, while a further section covers topics in biomedical engineering including drug delivery systems and biopharmaceuticals. The book concludes with chapters on computer-aided bioprocess engineering and systems biology.

This is a part of the Advanced Biotechnology book series, covering all pertinent aspects of the field with each volume prepared by eminent scientists who are experts on the topic in question.
Invaluable reading for biotechnologists and bioengineers, as well as those working in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Related Titles
  3. Title Page
    1. Copyright
  4. List of Contributors
  5. About the Series Editors
  6. Part I: Biocatalysis
    1. Chapter 1: Introduction to Emerging Areas in Bioengineering
      1. 1.1 Biotechnology
      2. 1.2 Bioengineering
      3. 1.3 Emerging Areas
      4. 1.4 Current Volume
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. References
    2. Chapter 2: Over-Expression of Functionally Active Inclusion Bodies of Enzymes in Recombinant Escherichia coli
      1. 2.1 Introduction
      2. 2.2 Formation and Composition of IBs
      3. 2.3 Enhancement of Protein Quality and Enzymatic Activity in IBs
      4. 2.4 Applications of Enzyme-Based IBs
      5. 2.5 An Example of IBs: N-acetyl-d-neuraminic Acid Aldolase
      6. 2.6 Concluding Remarks
      7. Acknowledgments
      8. References
    3. Chapter 3: Enzymatic Reactions in Ionic Liquids
      1. 3.1 Introduction
      2. 3.2 Enzymatic Reactions in Ionic Liquids
      3. 3.3 Factors Affecting Enzymatic Reactions in Ionic Liquids
      4. 3.4 Methods to Improve Enzyme Activity and Stability in Ionic Liquids
      5. 3.5 Conclusions and Perspectives
      6. Abbreviations of Ionic Liquids
      7. References
    4. Chapter 4: Enzyme Immobilization on Nanoparticles: Recent Applications
      1. 4.1 Introduction
      2. 4.2 Preparation of Enzyme-Immobilized Nanoparticles
      3. 4.3 Application of Enzyme Nanoparticles
      4. 4.4 Conclusion and Perspectives
      5. References
    5. Chapter 5: Whole Cell Biocatalysts Using Enzymes Displayed on Yeast Cell Surface
      1. Concise Definition of Subject
      2. 5.1 Introduction
      3. 5.2 GPI-Anchoring System
      4. 5.3 C-Terminus Free Display Systems
      5. 5.4 Applications of the Yeast Cell Surface Display System for Biocatalysts
      6. 5.5 Improvement of Catalytic Activity on the Yeast Cell Surface
      7. 5.6 Conclusions
      8. References
    6. Chapter 6: Design of Artificial Supramolecular Protein Assemblies by Enzymatic Bioconjugation for Biocatalytic Reactions
      1. Concise Definition of Subject
      2. 6.1 Introduction
      3. 6.2 Protein Assembly on a Template with Specific Interaction/Reaction Sites
      4. 6.3 Protein Assembly without a Template: Self-Assembly of Protein Units
      5. 6.4 Future Prospects
      6. Acknowledgment
      7. Conflict of Interest
      8. References
    7. Chapter 7: Production of Valuable Phenolic Compounds from Lignin by Biocatalysis: State-of-the-Art Perspective
      1. 7.1 Lignin and Its Composition
      2. 7.2 Phenol Derivatives Derived from Lignin Deconstruction
      3. 7.3 Biocatalysis to Increase the Value of Lignin-Derived Phenolic Compounds
      4. 7.4 Outlook and Future Perspectives
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. References
  7. Part II: Biofuels and Renewable Energy from Biomass
    1. Chapter 8: Biofuels, Bio-Power, and Bio-Products from Sustainable Biomass: Coupling Energy Crops and Organic Waste with Clean Energy Technologies
      1. 8.1 Introduction
      2. 8.2 Sustainable Biomass for Sustainable Development
      3. 8.3 Biorefineries and Bioenergy Conversion Pathways
      4. 8.4 Conclusions
      5. References
      6. Further Reading/Resources
    2. Chapter 9: Potential Lignocellulosic Biomass Resources in ASEAN Countries
      1. 9.1 Introduction and Characterization of Lignocellulosic Biomass in ASEAN Countries
      2. 9.2 Forest Residues in ASEAN Countries
      3. 9.3 Herbaceous Plants Residues in ASEAN Countries
      4. 9.4 Agriculture Residue in ASEAN Countries
      5. 9.5 ASEAN Government Programs and Policies on Natural Biomass
      6. References
    3. Chapter 10: Volatile Fatty Acid Platform: Concept and Application
      1. 10.1 Concept of Volatile Fatty Acid Platform
      2. 10.2 Application of VFA Platform
      3. 10.3 Tasks for Commercialization
      4. References
    4. Chapter 11: Biological Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Volatile Fatty Acid Production
      1. 11.1 Introduction
      2. 11.2 Pretreatments to Improve VFA Production
      3. 11.3 Future Prospect and Recent Technology Development
      4. References
    5. Chapter 12: Microbial Lipid Production from Volatile Fatty Acids by Oleaginous Yeast
      1. 12.1 Introduction
      2. 12.2 VFAs as a Carbon Source
      3. 12.3 Quality of Yeast Lipid
      4. 12.4 Conclusion
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. References
    6. Chapter 13: Gasification Technologies for Lignocellulosic Biomass
      1. 13.1 Introduction
      2. 13.2 Gasification of Lignocellulosic Biomass
      3. 13.3 Overview of Gasification Technologies of Lignocellulosic Biomass
      4. 13.4 Classification of Gasification Technologies
      5. 13.5 Types of Gasification Systems
      6. 13.6 Performance Evaluation of Biomass Gasifiers
      7. 13.7 Industrial Biomass Gasification Plants
      8. 13.8 Conclusion
      9. References
    7. Chapter 14: Separation of Butanol, Acetone, and Ethanol
      1. 14.1 Gas Stripping
      2. 14.2 Liquid–Liquid Extraction
      3. 14.3 Adsorption
      4. 14.4 Pervaporation
      5. 14.5 Distillation
      6. 14.6 Conclusion
      7. References
    8. Chapter 15: Overview of Microalgae-Based Carbon Capture and Utilization
      1. 15.1 Introduction
      2. 15.2 Capturing of Inorganic Carbon Using Photosynthesis
      3. 15.3 Microalgal Biofuel Production
      4. 15.4 Application of Microalgal By-Products
      5. 15.5 Conclusion
      6. References
    9. Chapter 16: Bioengineering of Microbial Fuel Cells: From Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathway to Electroactive Biofilm
      1. 16.1 Microbial Fuel Cells: General Concept and Extracellular Electron Transfer
      2. 16.2 Electroactive Biofilm Meets with Biocompatible Materials
      3. 16.3 Bioengineering of Electroactive Biofilm: From Bacteria to Ecosystem
      4. 16.4 Conclusions and Future Perspectives
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. References
  8. Part III: Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering
    1. Chapter 17: Genome Editing Tools for Escherichia coli and Their Application in Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology
      1. 17.1 Introduction
      2. 17.2 Homologous Recombination-Mediated Tools
      3. 17.3 Single-Strand DNA-Mediated Recombination
      4. 17.4 Conclusion
      5. References
    2. Chapter 18: Synthetic Biology for Corynebacterium glutamicum: An Industrial Host for White Biotechnology
      1. 18.1 Introduction
      2. 18.2 Synthetic Elements of Synthetic Biology for C. glutamicum
      3. 18.3 Conclusion and Outlook
      4. References
    3. Chapter 19: Metabolic Engineering of Solventogenic Clostridia for Butanol Production
      1. 19.1 Introduction
      2. 19.2 Biomass and Its Metabolism
      3. 19.3 Metabolic Engineering of Clostridia
      4. 19.4 Concluding Remarks and Future Perspectives
      5. References
    4. Chapter 20: Metabolic Engineering of Microorganisms for the Production of Lactate-Containing Polyesters
      1. Acknowledgments
      2. References
    5. Chapter 21: Microbial Metabolic Engineering for Production of Food Ingredients
      1. 21.1 Metabolic Engineering
      2. 21.2 Biological Production of Functional Food Materials
      3. 21.3 Future Prospects
      4. References
  9. Part IV: Products
    1. Chapter 22: Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Food Biotechnology
      1. Concise Definition of Subject and Its Importance
      2. 22.1 Lactic Acid Bacteria
      3. 22.2 Expression Systems in LAB
      4. 22.3 In silico Metabolic Pathway Model for LAB
      5. 22.4 The Prospect: Lactic Acid Bacteria as an Edible Therapeutic Probiotics
      6. References
    2. Chapter 23: Biopolymers Based on Raw Materials from Biomass
      1. 23.1 Introduction
      2. 23.2 Poly(butylene succinate)
      3. 23.3 Conclusion
      4. References
    3. Chapter 24: Bacterial Biofertilizers: High Density Cultivation
      1. 24.1 Introduction
      2. 24.2 Cultivation Strategies for a Few Important Bacterial Inoculants
      3. Conflict of Interest
      4. References
  10. Part V: Biosensing and Nanobiotechnology
    1. Chapter 25: Current Research in Korean Herbal Cosmetics
      1. 25.1 Introduction
      2. 25.2 Korean Herbal Medicine and Bioscience
      3. 25.3 Bioprocessing of Natural Compounds in Traditional Herbal Medicine
      4. 25.4 Skin Delivery Systems in Cosmetics
      5. 25.5 Conclusions
      6. References
    2. Chapter 26: Advanced Genetic Engineering of Microbial Cells for Biosensing Applications
      1. 26.1 Introduction
      2. 26.2 Genetic Engineering of Microbial Reporter Cells
      3. 26.3 Methods to Immobilize Cells and Maintain Cell Viability
      4. 26.4 Microbial Biosensors Based on Transducers
      5. 26.5 Conclusion and Future Prospects
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    3. Chapter 27: Bioelectronic Nose
      1. 27.1 Introduction
      2. 27.2 Concept of Bioelectronic Nose
      3. 27.3 Primary Transducer for Bioelectronic Nose
      4. 27.4 Secondary Transducer for Bioelectronic Nose
      5. 27.5 Applications
      6. 27.6 Conclusion
      7. Acknowledgment
      8. References
    4. Chapter 28: Noninvasive Optical Imaging Techniques in Clinical Application
      1. 28.1 Fluorescence Diagnosis of Skin or Mucosa
      2. 28.2 Fluorescence Endoscopic Surgery
      3. 28.3 Fluorescence Image-Guided Intraoperative Open Surgery
      4. 28.4 Conclusion
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. References
    5. Chapter 29: Advanced Short Tandem Repeat Genotyping for Forensic Human Identification
      1. 29.1 DNA Sample Sources and Collection
      2. 29.2 DNA Extraction from Biological Sources
      3. 29.3 Short Tandem Repeat Markers and Commercial Kits
      4. 29.4 Amplification of STR Loci
      5. 29.5 Capillary Electrophoretic Separation of STR Amplicons
      6. 29.6 Total Integrated Forensic STR Typing System
      7. 29.7 Conclusion
      8. References
    6. Chapter 30: DNA Microarray-Based Technologies to Genotype Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms
      1. 30.1 Allele-Specific Oligonucleotide Competitive Hybridization (ASOCH)
      2. 30.2 Zip-Code Microarray
      3. 30.3 Universal Amplification-Based Technology
      4. 30.4 Bead Array Platform-Based SNP Genotyping
      5. 30.5 Conclusion
      6. References
    7. Chapter 31: Advanced Applications of Nanoscale Measuring System for Biosensors
      1. Chapter Outline
      2. 31.1 Nanoscale Gravimetric Measuring System for Chiral Recognition
      3. 31.2 Nanoscale Measuring System Using Two-Photon-Adsorbed Photopolymerization for Biosensors
      4. 31.3 Nanoscale Measuring Systems Using AFM for Biosensors
      5. 31.4 Nanoscale Measuring Systems with Nanoscale Motion Detection
      6. References
    8. Chapter 32: Biosynthesis and Applications of Silver Nanoparticles
      1. Concise Definition of Subject
      2. 32.1 Introduction
      3. 32.2 Silver Nanoparticles
      4. 32.3 Plants in Nanoparticle Synthesis
      5. 32.4 Parameters Affecting Synthesis of AgNPs
      6. 32.5 Mechanism of AgNP Synthesis
      7. 32.6 Applications of AgNPs
      8. 32.7 Conclusion
      9. References
  11. Part VI: Biomedical Engineering and Biopharmaceuticals
    1. Chapter 33: Smart Drug Delivery Devices and Implants
      1. 33.1 Introduction
      2. 33.2 External Drug Delivery Devices
      3. 33.3 Internal Drug Delivery Implants
      4. 33.4 Image-Guided Drug Delivery Systems
      5. 33.5 Summary and Perspectives
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    2. Chapter 34: Controlled Delivery Systems of Protein and Peptide Therapeutics
      1. 34.1 Introduction
      2. 34.2 Drug Delivery Systems for Protein and Peptide Therapeutics
      3. 34.3 Clinical Development of Protein and Peptide Delivery Systems
      4. 34.4 Summary and Perspectives
      5. References
    3. Chapter 35: Cell Delivery Systems Using Biomaterials
      1. 35.1 Introduction to Cell-Based Therapeutics
      2. 35.2 Biomaterials as Cell Delivery Vehicles
      3. 35.3 Cell Delivery Strategies
      4. 35.4 Conclusion and Future Perspective
      5. References
    4. Chapter 36: Bioengineered Cell-Derived Vesicles as Drug Delivery Carriers
      1. 36.1 Introduction
      2. 36.2 Prokaryotic Cell-Derived Nanocarriers
      3. 36.3 Eukaryotic Cell-Derived Nanocarriers
      4. 36.4 Cell Membrane-Camouflaged Nanoparticles
      5. 36.5 Conclusions
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    5. Chapter 37: Advanced Genetic Fusion Techniques for Improving the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Biologics
      1. Concise Definition of the Subject
      2. 37.1 Background
      3. 37.2 Fc-Fusion Technology
      4. 37.3 Albumin Fusion Technology
      5. 37.4 Transferrin Fusion Technology
      6. 37.5 CTP Fusion Technology
      7. 37.6 Summary
      8. References
    6. Chapter 38: Mussel-Mimetic Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering Applications
      1. 38.1 Introduction
      2. 38.2 Synthetic and Natural Polymer-Based Mussel-Mimetic Biomaterials
      3. 38.3 Tissue Adhesives
      4. 38.4 Biomolecule Immobilization and Drug Delivery
      5. 38.5 Concluding Remarks
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    7. Chapter 39: Mass Production of Full-Length IgG Monoclonal Antibodies from Mammalian, Yeast, and Bacterial Hosts
      1. 39.1 Mass Production of Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies in Mammalian Cells
      2. 39.2 Mass Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Yeast
      3. 39.3 Mass Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Escherichia coli
      4. 39.4 Conclusion
      5. References
    8. Chapter 40: Recent Advances in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Methods for Discovery of Protein Biomarkers for Complex Human Diseases
      1. Concise Definition of Subject
      2. 40.1 Introduction
      3. 40.2 MS-Based Proteomic Analysis Pipeline for Discovery of Protein Biomarkers
      4. 40.3 Discovery of Protein Biomarkers Using LC–MS/MS Analysis
      5. 40.4 Analysis of Proteomic Data for the Biomarker Discovery
      6. 40.5 Verification and Validation of Biomarker Candidates
      7. References
  12. Part VII: Computer-Aided Bioprocess Design and Systems Biology
    1. Chapter 41: Overview on Bioprocess Simulation
      1. 41.1 Introduction
      2. 41.2 Modeling and Design of Bioprocess
      3. 41.3 Monitoring of Bioprocess
      4. 41.4 Control of Bioprocess
      5. 41.5 Computational Fluid Dynamics in Bioprocess Simulation
      6. References
    2. Chapter 42: Bioprocess Simulation and Scheduling
      1. 42.1 The Purpose of Bioprocess Simulation
      2. 42.2 Detailed Modeling of Single Batch Bioprocesses
      3. 42.3 Design and Operation of Multiproduct Facilities
      4. 42.4 Conclusion
      5. Abbreviations
      6. References
    3. Chapter 43: Metabolism-Combined Growth Model Construction and Its Application to Optimal Bioreactor Operation
      1. 43.1 Introduction
      2. 43.2 Growth Model Construction and a Diversity of Modification Methods
      3. 43.3 Optimal Decision-Making System
      4. 43.4 Case Study
      5. 43.5 Summary
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    4. Chapter 44: Software Applications for Phenotype Analysis and Strain Design of Cellular Systems
      1. 44.1 Introduction
      2. 44.2 COBRA Framework
      3. 44.3 COBRA Software Applications
      4. 44.4 Utilizing the Potential of COBRA Software Applications Suite: A Practical Case Study
      5. 44.5 Conclusions and Future Perspectives
      6. References
    5. Chapter 45: Metabolic Network Modeling for Computer-Aided Design of Microbial Interactions
      1. 45.1 Biological Computer-Aided Design of Interactions
      2. 45.2 Community Metabolic Network Reconstruction
      3. 45.3 Prediction of Interactions Using Metabolic Networks
      4. 45.4 Conclusions
      5. Acknowledgments
      6. Conflicts of Interest
      7. References
    6. Index
  13. End User License Agreement