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Total Quality Management

Book Description

Total Quality Management: Key Concepts and Case Studies provides the full range of management principles and practices that govern the quality function. The book covers the fundamentals and background needed, as well as industry case studies and comprehensive topic coverage, making it an invaluable reference to both the novice and the more experienced individual.

Aspects of quality control that are widely utilized in practice are combined with those that are commonly referred to on University courses, and the latest developments in quality concepts are also presented. This book is an ideal quick reference for any manager, designer, engineer, or researcher interested in quality.

  • Features two chapters on the latest ISO standards
  • Includes an introduction to statistics to help the reader fully grasp content on statistical quality control
  • Contains case studies that explore many TQM themes in real life situations

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. About the Author
  6. Foreword
  7. Preface
  8. Acknowledgments
  9. About the Book
  10. Chapter 1: Total Quality Management: An Overview
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 What Is Quality?
    3. 1.2 Quality Definitions
    4. 1.3 Quotes on Quality
    5. 1.4 The Scale of Quality
    6. 1.5 The Paradigm of TQM
    7. 1.6 How can Effective TQM Change the Situation?
    8. 1.7 Quality of Design Versus Quality of Conformance
    9. 1.8 Changing Criteria of Quality
    10. 1.9 The Five Approaches to Quality
    11. 1.10 PDCA Cycle
    12. 1.11 When to Use the PDCA Cycle
    13. 1.12 Variations of PDCA Terminology
    14. 1.13 Deming’s Fourteen Points to Improve Quality
    15. 1.14 Deming System of Profound Knowledge
    16. 1.15 Juran Quality Trilogy
    17. 1.16 Conclusion
  11. Chapter 2: Evolution of Total Quality Management
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Introduction
    3. 2.2 The Historical Development of TQM
    4. 2.3 Quality Management in the Japanese Scenario
    5. 2.4 Post-Deming/Juran Quality Scenario
    6. 2.5 Conclusion
  12. Chapter 3: Quality Gurus
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 Wilfredo Pareto
    3. 3.2 Walter A. Shewhart
    4. 3.3 Edwards Deming
    5. 3.4 Joseph Juran
    6. 3.5 Armand Feigenbaum
    7. 3.6 Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis
    8. 3.7 Shigeo Shingo
    9. 3.8 Taichi Ohno
    10. 3.9 Kaoru Ishikawa
    11. 3.10 Genichi Taguchi
    12. 3.11 Phillip B. Crosby
    13. 3.12 Yoshio Kondo
    14. 3.13 Shigeru Mizuno
    15. 3.14 Yoji Akao
    16. 3.15 Noriaki Kano
    17. 3.16 Masaaki Imai
    18. 3.17 Claus Möller
    19. 3.18 Blanton Godfrey
    20. 3.19 Clarence Irwing Lewis
    21. 3.20 David Garvin
    22. 3.21 Dorian Shainin
    23. 3.22 Edward de Bono
    24. 3.23 Eliyahu M. Goldratt
    25. 3.24 Eugene L. Grant
    26. 3.25 Bill Conway
    27. 3.26 Yasutoshi Washio
    28. Further Reading
  13. Chapter 4: Leadership and TQM
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 What is Leadership?
    3. 4.2 Definitions for Leadership
    4. 4.3 Theories of Leadership
    5. 4.4 Leadership Categories
    6. 4.5 Leadership and Goal Setting
    7. 4.6 Characteristics of Quality Leaders
    8. 4.7 Warren Bennis Principles of Great Teams
    9. 4.8 The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Leaders
    10. 4.9 The Ten Commandments of cGMPs (Current Good Manufacturing Practices)
    11. 4.10 Fifty Insights for CEOs
    12. 4.11 Fifteen Thoughts of Chanakya
    13. 4.12 Wilkie’s Leadership Qualities
    14. 4.13 Leadership Responsibilities
    15. 4.14 Moral Leadership
    16. 4.15 Contributors for Moral Leadership
    17. 4.16 Role of Top Management in Quality Management
    18. 4.17 Leadership and Knowledge of Psychology
    19. 4.18 Case Studies on Leadership Qualities
    20. 4.19 Some Quotations on Leadership
    21. 4.20 Conclusion
  14. Chapter 5: Scientific Management
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 TQM and Scientific Management
    3. 5.2 The Industrial Revolution
    4. 5.3 Evolution of Management Thinking
    5. 5.4 Phases of Growth of Management Thinking
    6. 5.5 Early Pioneers in Management Thinking– Pre-19th Century
    7. 5.6 Concepts of Scientific Management
    8. 5.7 Specific Aims of Scientific Management
    9. 5.8 Advantages of Scientific Management
    10. 5.9 Misconceptions of Scientific Management
    11. 5.10 Resistance to Scientific Management
    12. 5.11 Conclusion
  15. Chapter 6: System Approach to Management Theory
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Development of System Approach
    3. 6.2 What is a System?
    4. 6.3 Definition of a System
    5. 6.4 Types of Systems
    6. 6.5 Components of a System
    7. 6.6 Elements of Control in System Approach
    8. 6.7 Effect of Environment on the Systems
    9. 6.8 Open and Closed Systems
    10. 6.9 Systems and Subsystems
    11. 6.10 Relationship Between the Systems and Subsystems
    12. 6.11 Combination of Subsystems
    13. 6.12 The Management Cube
    14. 6.13 Planning Pyramid
    15. 6.14 Summary of the Features of Management as a System
    16. 6.15 Decision Theory
    17. 6.16 Problem Analysis and Decision-Making
    18. 6.17 Characteristics of Decision-Making
    19. 6.18 Situations Under Which Decisions are Taken
    20. 6.19 Classifications of Decisions
    21. 6.20 Different Approaches to Decision-Making
    22. 6.21 Bias in Decision-Making
    23. 6.22 Decision Tree
    24. 6.23 Systematic Decision-Making
    25. 6.24 Proper Management Decision and Proper Engineering Design
    26. 6.25 Conclusion
  16. Chapter 7: Strategic Planning
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Introduction
    3. 7.2 Business Plans
    4. 7.3 Strategic Planning
    5. 7.4 Methodologies for Strategic Planning
    6. 7.5 Situational Analysis
    7. 7.6 Hoshin Kanri
    8. 7.7 Definitions of Strategic Planning
    9. 7.8 Strategic Planning Elements
    10. 7.9 Besterfield’s Seven Steps of Strategic Planning
    11. 7.10 Strategy Development and Strategy Deployment
    12. 7.11 Effectiveness of the Strategic Planning
    13. 7.12 The Four Perspectives for Translating Strategy into Operating Process
    14. 7.13 Quality Planning
    15. 7.14 Contingency Theory
    16. 7.15 Organizing for Strategic Planning
    17. 7.16 Leavitt's Diamond
    18. 7.17 Mission and Vision Statements
    19. 7.18 Caution in the Application of Strategic Planning
    20. 7.19 Conclusion
  17. Chapter 8: Cost of Quality
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Introduction
    3. 8.2 Forces Leading to the Concept
    4. 8.3 The Categories of Quality Costs
    5. 8.4 Hidden Quality Costs
    6. 8.5 Cost of Lost Opportunities
    7. 8.6 Service Costs
    8. 8.7 Tangible and Intangible Costs
    9. 8.8 Visible Costs and Invisible Costs
    10. 8.9 Quality Cost Data
    11. 8.10 Case Studies on Research Done in the Area of Quality Costing
    12. 8.11 Suggested Model for Quality Costing
    13. 8.12 Sources for Collecting Quality Cost Data
    14. 8.13 Uses of Quality Cost Analysis
    15. 8.14 Pareto Principle
    16. 8.15 Quality Conformance Level
    17. 8.16 Top Management Role in Containing Quality Costs
    18. 8.17 Quality and Safety
    19. 8.18 Responsibility of Top Management for Product Safety
    20. 8.19 Case Study on Quality Cost
    21. 8.20 Conclusion
  18. Chapter 9: Organization for TQM
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Why Organization?
    3. 9.2 What Needs to Be Organized in the Quality Function?
    4. 9.3 Principles of Organization
    5. 9.4 Classes of Organizational Structures
    6. 9.5 Organization for the Quality Function
    7. 9.6 Centralized Organization
    8. 9.7 Decentralized Organization
    9. 9.8 Matrix Type of Organization
    10. 9.9 Factors to Be Considered in Deciding the Manpower Requirement
    11. 9.10 Size and Type of an Organization
    12. 9.11 Conclusion
  19. Chapter 10: Customer Satisfaction
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Sellers’ Market Versus Buyers’ Market
    3. 10.2 Customer is King
    4. 10.3 Position of the Customer in an Organization
    5. 10.4 Customer’s Perception of Quality
    6. 10.5 Types of Customers
    7. 10.6 Internal Customers
    8. 10.7 Customer Satisfaction
    9. 10.8 Customer Delight
    10. 10.9 Kano Model of Customer Satisfaction
    11. 10.10 American Customer Satisfaction Index
    12. 10.11 Customer Retention
    13. 10.12 Customer Loyalty
    14. 10.13 Factors for Establishing Loyal Customers
    15. 10.14 Customer Attrition
    16. 10.15 How Companies Lose Their Customers
    17. 10.16 Customer Surveys
    18. 10.17 Customer and Quality Service
    19. 10.18 The Key Elements of Service Quality
    20. 10.19 Customer Retention Versus Employee Morale
    21. 10.20 Action to be Taken to Handle Customer Complaints
    22. 10.21 Healthy Practices by Customer Focused Organizations
    23. 10.22 Customer Code of Ethics to be Followed
    24. 10.23 Recently Held International Quality Symposia
    25. 10.24 Conclusion
  20. Chapter 11: Total Employee Involvement
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 What is Total Employee Involvement?
    3. 11.2 Motivation
    4. 11.3 Employee Involvement Strategies
    5. 11.4 Teamwork
    6. 11.5 Empowerment
    7. 11.6 Participative Management
    8. 11.7 Effect of Worker Representation on Productivity
    9. 11.8 How to Successfully Implement a Change
    10. 11.9 Theodore Kinni’s Eight Tips for Achieving Motivated Workforce
    11. 11.10 Benefits of Employee Involvement
    12. 11.11 Role of Senior Management in Employee Involvement
    13. 11.12 Recognition and Rewards
    14. 11.13 Forms of Recognition and Rewards
    15. 11.14 Criteria for Effective Recognition of Employees
    16. 11.15 Advantages of Effective Rewarding Systems
    17. 11.16 Conclusion
    18. Appendix A Case Study on Worker Involvement
  21. Chapter 12: Supplier Partnership
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1 Introduction
    3. 12.2 Traditional Versus TQM Oriented Vendor Relations
    4. 12.3 Partnership Definition
    5. 12.4 Strategic Partnership
    6. 12.5 Principles of Customer/Supplier Relations
    7. 12.6 The Three Primary and Necessary Requirements for Partnering
    8. 12.7 Multiple Supplier Partnership
    9. 12.8 Advantages of Supplier Partnership
    10. 12.9 Supplier Selection
    11. 12.10 Vendor Rating
    12. 12.11 Criteria for Evaluation
    13. 12.12 The Partnership Indices
    14. 12.13 Supplier Certification
    15. 12.14 Benefits of Supplier Rating
    16. 12.15 Lean Inspection Through Supplier Partnership
    17. 12.16 Vendor Managed Inventory
    18. 12.17 Retailer Supplier Partnership
    19. 12.18 Impact of Supplier Partnership on Inventory Norms
    20. 12.19 Conclusion
  22. Chapter 13: Total Productive Maintenance
    1. Abstract
    2. 13.1 Introduction
    3. 13.2 The Meaning of TPM
    4. 13.3 Evolution of TPM
    5. 13.4 Definitions of TPM
    6. 13.5 TPM is an Extension of TQM
    7. 13.6 TPM Starts With Cleaning
    8. 13.7 The Seven Types of Abnormalities
    9. 13.8 The Eight Pillars of TPM
    10. 13.9 The Five Zeros of TPM
    11. 13.10 Why Operatives Fail to Adapt TPM as a Way of Life?
    12. 13.11 What Can TPM Achieve?
    13. 13.12 Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)
    14. 13.13 The Six Losses From Poor OEE
    15. 13.14 The Three Levels of Autonomous Maintenance in TPM
    16. 13.15 The Five Goals of TPM
    17. 13.16 Procedure for the Implementation of TPM
    18. 13.17 Maintenance Work Sampling
    19. 13.18 Conclusion
    20. Checklist for JIPE’s Productive Maintenance Excellence Award
  23. Chapter 14: Quality Awards
    1. Abstract
    2. 14.1 Why Quality Awards?
    3. 14.2 International Quality Awards
    4. 14.3 International Quality Award Trio
    5. 14.4 Deming Application Prize
    6. 14.5 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award
    7. 14.6 European Quality Prizes
    8. 14.7 Australian Business Excellence Award
    9. 14.8 Canadian Award for Business Excellence (CABE)
    10. 14.9 Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award
    11. 14.10 Golden Peacock National Quality Award
    12. 14.11 IMC-Ramakrishna Bajaj National Quality Award (IMCRBNQA)
    13. 14.12 China Quality Award
    14. 14.13 National Quality/Business Excellence Awards in Different Countries
    15. 14.14 Basic Differences Among the Award Trio
    16. 14.15 Conclusion
    17. Appendix 14.1 Recipients of Deming Application Prizes From 1998
    18. Appendix 14.2 Some International Awards Including Quality Awards
    19. Appendix 14.3 Recipients of Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award
    20. Appendix 14.4 Recipients of NIQR Awards in 2014
    21. Appendix 14.5 Recipients of Golden Peacock Awards
  24. Chapter 15: Quality Circles
    1. Abstract
    2. 15.1 What is a Quality Circle?
    3. 15.2 Origin of Quality Circles
    4. 15.3 The American Scenario
    5. 15.4 The Indian Scenario
    6. 15.5 Significance of Quality Circles
    7. 15.6 Objectives of Quality Circles
    8. 15.7 Nature of Problems That Can be Solved by Quality Circles
    9. 15.8 Ten Conditions for Successful Quality Circles
    10. 15.9 Road Map to be followed in a Quality Circle Meeting
    11. 15.10 Characteristics of an Effective Quality Circle Meeting
    12. 15.11 Structure of a Quality Circle
    13. 15.12 Conclusion
  25. Chapter 16: Fundamentals of Statistics— Part I
    1. Abstract
    2. 16.1 Definition of Statistics
    3. 16.2 Role of Statistics in Analysis
    4. 16.3 Limitation of Statistics
    5. 16.4 Elements of Statistical Techniques
    6. 16.5 Methods of Collecting Data
    7. 16.6 Data Classification
    8. 16.7 Data Presentation
    9. 16.8 Population Versus Sample
    10. 16.9 Attributes and Variables
    11. 16.10 Graphs
    12. 16.11 Single Dimensional Diagrams—Bar Charts
    13. 16.12 Innovative Graphs
    14. 16.13 Frequency Graphs
    15. 16.14 Ogive
    16. 16.15 “Z” Chart
    17. 16.16 Lorenz Curves
    18. 16.17 Frequency Distribution
    19. 16.18 Central Tendency
    20. 16.19 Measures of Central Tendency
    21. 16.20 Mean or an Average
    22. 16.21 Arithmetic Mean
    23. 16.22 Geometric Mean, Quadratic Mean, and Harmonic Mean
    24. 16.23 Median
    25. 16.24 Mode
    26. 16.25 Dispersion
    27. 16.26 Range
    28. 16.27 Mean Deviation
    29. 16.28 Standard Deviation
    30. 16.29 Skewness
    31. 16.30 Kurtosis
    32. 16.31 Conclusion
  26. Chapter 17: Fundamentals of Statistics— Part II
    1. Abstract
    2. 17.1 Correlation
    3. 17.2 Regression
    4. 17.3 Relation between Correlation and Regression
    5. 17.4 Sampling Theory
    6. 17.5 Probability
    7. 17.6 Laws of Probability
    8. 17.7 Conclusion
  27. Chapter 18: Process Capability
    1. Abstract
    2. 18.1 Statistical Process Control
    3. 18.2 Why Control Charts?
    4. 18.3 Reasons for Variations
    5. 18.4 Process Capability
    6. 18.5 Process Capability Index
    7. 18.6 One-Sided and Two-Sided Specifications
    8. 18.7 Taguchi Capability Index
    9. 18.8 Recommended Minimum Values of Cpk
    10. 18.9 Conclusion
  28. Chapter 19: Inward Inspection
    1. Abstract
    2. 19.1 Definitions of Inspection
    3. 19.2 Objectives of Inspection
    4. 19.3 Steps Involved in Inspection
    5. 19.4 Classifications of Inspection Methods
    6. 19.5 Source Inspection
    7. 19.6 Inward Inspection
    8. 19.7 Single and Double Sampling Inspection
    9. 19.8 In Process Inspection and Final Inspection
    10. 19.9 Tools of Inspection
    11. 19.10 Normal Jobs of a Quality Control Inspector
    12. 19.11 Requirements of an Inspector
    13. 19.12 Conclusion
  29. Chapter 20: Seven Traditional Tools of TQM
    1. Abstract
    2. 20.1 Introduction
    3. 20.2 Check Sheets and Checklists
    4. 20.3 Histogram or Bar Graph
    5. 20.4 Scatter Diagram
    6. 20.5 Control Chart
    7. 20.6 Pareto Principle
    8. 20.7 Cause and Effect Diagram
    9. 20.8 Flow Charts
    10. 20.9 Conclusion
    11. Process Chart
    12. Outline Process Chart
    13. Flow Process Chart
    14. Flow Diagram
  30. Chapter 21: The Seven Modern Tools of TQM
    1. Abstract
    2. 21.1 The Seven Traditional Tools of TQM
    3. 21.2 The Seven Modern TQM Tools
    4. 21.3 Affinity Diagram (KJ Method)
    5. 21.4 Interrelationship Diagraph
    6. 21.5 Tree Diagram
    7. 21.6 Prioritization Matrix
    8. 21.7 Process Decision Program Chart
    9. 21.8 Activity Network Diagram
    10. 21.9 Single Minute Exchange of Dies
    11. 21.9.3 Factors Stressed Upon by Shigeo Shingo, the Originator of SMED
    12. 21.10 Force Field Analysis
    13. 21.11 Criteria Rating Form
    14. 21.12 Models That Can be Used to Represent a Problem
    15. 21.13 Other Analytical Testing Methods for Safety
    16. 21.14 Conclusion
  31. Chapter 22: Kaizen and Continuous Improvement
    1. Abstract
    2. 22.1 What is Kaizen?
    3. 22.2 Significance of Kaizen in Continuous Improvement
    4. 22.3 Why Continuous Improvement?
    5. 22.4 Some Illustrations of the Continuous Process Improvements
    6. 22.5 Kaizen is the Umbrella
    7. 22.6 Requirements for Continuous Improvement
    8. 22.7 Industrial Engineering Principles vs. Kaizen Principles
    9. 22.8 Importance of Creativity
    10. 22.9 Creative Methodology
    11. 22.10 The Principles of Creativity
    12. 22.11 Brainstorming
    13. 22.12 Six Thinking Hats
    14. 22.13 Primary and Secondary Questions
    15. 22.14 Develop
    16. 22.15 Define
    17. 22.16 Install
    18. 22.17 Maintain
    19. 22.18 Checklist for Operation Examination
    20. 22.19 Other Continuous Improvement Techniques
    21. 22.20 Case Studies on Kaizen Applications
    22. 22.21 Some Quotations on Change
    23. 22.22 Conclusion
  32. Chapter 23: 5S
    1. Abstract
    2. 23.1 Introduction
    3. 23.2 Explanation of the 5Ss
    4. 23.3 9-Step Procedure for Implementing 5S
    5. 23.4 5S Audit Sheet
    6. 23.5 An Easy Way of Remembering the 5S Terms
    7. 23.6 Conclusion
  33. Chapter 24: Six Sigma
    1. Abstract
    2. 24.1 Introduction
    3. 24.2 Definitions of Six Sigma
    4. 24.3 History of Six Sigma
    5. 24.4 Required Skills for Black Belted Experts in Six Sigma
    6. 24.5 The Concept of Six Sigma in the Context of TQM
    7. 24.6 Origin of This Confusion Between Statistical 6σ and TQM Six Sigma
    8. 24.7 Six Sigma According to General Electric
    9. 24.8 The Values of the Defect Percentages
    10. 24.9 Methodologies for Six Sigma
    11. 24.10 DMAIC Methodology for Six Sigma
    12. 24.11 DMADV
    13. 24.12 Detailed Methodology of DMAIC
    14. 24.13 Organizing for Six Sigma
    15. 24.14 Software Used for Six Sigma
    16. 24.15 The Case Study of Mumbai Dabbawalas
    17. 24.16 Conclusion
  34. Chapter 25: Lean Management
    1. Abstract
    2. 25.1 What is Lean Management?
    3. 25.2 Components of Lean Management
    4. 25.3 Definitions on Lean Management
    5. 25.4 Evolution of Lean Concept
    6. 25.5 The House of Lean Management
    7. 25.6 What can Lean Management Achieve?
    8. 25.7 Increased Reliability with Lean Management
    9. 25.8 The Eight Losses in Manufacturing Leading to Lean Management
    10. 25.9 The 5 Key Drivers in Lean Management System
    11. 25.10 The 8 Ps of Lean Thinking
    12. 25.11 Lean Enterprise Implementation Processes and Tools
    13. 25.12 Road Map for Lean Management
    14. 25.13 Illustration of a Pit Shop Maintenance Situation
    15. 25.14 Conclusion
  35. Chapter 26: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis
    1. Abstract
    2. 26.1 Uncertainties During Development
    3. 26.2 Failure Modes and Effects Analysis
    4. 26.3 History of the Development of FMEA
    5. 26.4 Multiple Causes and Effects Involved in FMEA
    6. 26.5 Types of FMEA’s
    7. 26.6 When to Use FMEA
    8. 26.7 Basic Terms of Reference in FMEA
    9. 26.8 Risk Priority Number
    10. 26.9 Procedure for FMEA
    11. 26.10 Responsibility for Action
    12. 26.11 Benefits of FMEA
    13. 26.12 FMEA Software
    14. 26.13 Conclusion
  36. Chapter 27: Reliability Engineering
    1. Abstract
    2. 27.1 Functional Reliability
    3. 27.2 General Causes for Poor Reliability
    4. 27.3 Distinguishing Between Quality and Reliability
    5. 27.4 What is RBM?
    6. 27.5 Bath Tub Characteristics
    7. 27.6 Basics of RBM
    8. 27.7 Principles of Reliability Engineering
    9. 27.8 House of Reliability
    10. 27.9 Types of Failures
    11. 27.10 Severity of Failures
    12. 27.11 Statistical Distribution Curves of Failures
    13. 27.12 Probability Density Function
    14. 27.13 Procedure of Establishing Reliability Based Product Quality
    15. 27.14 Reliability Prediction
    16. 27.15 Monte Carlo Simulation
    17. 27.16 Markov Analysis
    18. 27.17 Conclusion
  37. Chapter 28: Business Process Reengineering
    1. Abstract
    2. 28.1 History of Business Process Reengineering
    3. 28.2 Definitions of Business Process Reengineering
    4. 28.3 Business Process Reengineering as a TQM Technique
    5. 28.4 The Role of Information Technology
    6. 28.5 Methodology for BPR (Fig. 28.1)
    7. 28.6 Process Reengineering Life Cycle Approach for BPR
    8. 28.7 Criticism Against BPR
    9. 28.8 Satisfactory Underperformance
    10. 28.9 The Sweet and Sour Cycle
    11. 28.10 Business Process Management
    12. 28.11 Conclusion
  38. Chapter 29: Benchmarking
    1. Abstract
    2. 29.1 What is Benchmarking?
    3. 29.2 Definitions for Benchmarking
    4. 29.3 Types of Benchmarking
    5. 29.4 Some of the Parameters That Can be Benchmarked
    6. 29.5 General Concept of Benchmarking
    7. 29.6 Phases of Benchmarking
    8. 29.7 Stage of Benchmarking
    9. 29.8 Different Approaches to Benchmarking
    10. 29.9 Tips for the Consultants
    11. 29.10 Costs of Benchmarking
    12. 29.11 Advantages of Benchmarking
    13. 29.12 Limitations of Benchmarking
    14. 29.13 Professional Associations and Institutions Exclusively for Benchmarking
    15. 29.14 Conclusion
  39. Chapter 30: Quality Function Deployment
    1. Abstract
    2. 30.1 Why Quality Function Deployment?
    3. 30.2 Definitions of QFD
    4. 30.3 History of QFD
    5. 30.4 Issues That Would be Addressed by QFD
    6. 30.5 The Four Phases of QFD
    7. 30.6 Building a House of Quality
    8. 30.7 Voice of the Customer
    9. 30.8 Voice of the Organization
    10. 30.9 Framework for House of Quality
    11. 30.10 Building Up of House of Quality
    12. 30.11 Procedure for QFD
    13. 30.12 Benefits of QFD
    14. 30.13 Conclusion
  40. Chapter 31: Quality Loss Function
    1. Abstract
    2. 31.1 What is Quality Loss?
    3. 31.2 Precision vs. Accuracy
    4. 31.3 History of the Development of the Concept of the Loss Function
    5. 31.4 Taguchi Philosophy
    6. 31.5 Quality Loss Function
    7. 31.6 Off-Line Quality Control Rule for Manufacturing
    8. 31.7 Design of Experiments
    9. 31.8 Robustification
    10. 31.9 Noise Variables
    11. 31.10 Case Study
    12. 31.11 Conclusion
  41. Chapter 32: Design for Quality
    1. Abstract
    2. 32.1 Design for Quality
    3. 32.2 Design for Six Sigma
    4. 32.3 Acronyms for Methodologies Akin to DMAIC
    5. 32.4 DMADV
    6. 32.5 Scope of DFSS
    7. 32.6 Six Sigma Versus DFSS
    8. 32.7 Benefits of DFSS
    9. 32.8 Conclusion
  42. Chapter 33: Value Engineering
    1. Abstract
    2. 33.1 What is Value Engineering?
    3. 33.2 Definitions of Value Engineering
    4. 33.3 History of Value Engineering
    5. 33.4 What is Value?
    6. 33.5 Value Analysis
    7. 33.6 Objectives of Value Engineering
    8. 33.7 Typical Benefits of Value Engineering Projects
    9. 33.8 Functions of a Product as the Customer Wants It
    10. 33.9 Functional Value of a Product Versus Other Values
    11. 33.10 Methodology of Value Engineering
    12. 33.11 Function Analysis System Technique
    13. 33.12 Case Study
    14. 33.13 Conclusion
  43. Chapter 34: ISO 9000 Quality Systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 34.1 Need for Quality Management Systems
    3. 34.2 International Organization for Standardization
    4. 34.3 ISO 9000 Series of Quality Standards
    5. 34.4 Evolution of ISO 9000 Family of Standards
    6. 34.5 ISO/TS16949
    7. 34.6 QS-9000 Series
    8. 34.7 Requirements as Specified by ISO 9000
    9. 34.8 Bureau of Indian Standards
    10. 34.9 Vision and Mission Statement
    11. 34.10 Mission Statement
    12. 34.11 Objectives, Goals, and Action Plans
    13. 34.12 SOP—Standard Operating Procedures
    14. 34.13 Specific Features of ISO 9004
    15. 34.14 Steps to be Followed for Getting ISO Certification
    16. 34.15 Benefits of ISO 9001-2000 and TS 16949 Quality Systems
    17. 34.16 ISO 9000:2005
    18. 34.17 2015 Revision of ISO 9000 Series
    19. 34.18 The Six Stages of the Release of the 2015 Revision
    20. 34.19 Revision of ISO 9000 in 2015
    21. 34.20 Conclusion
  44. Chapter 35: ISO 14000 Quality Systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 35.1 Introduction
    3. 35.2 Evolution of the ISO Standards on Environmental Issues
    4. 35.3 Global Environmental Issues
    5. 35.4 Magna Carta on Environment
    6. 35.5 International Initiatives on Environmental Issues
    7. 35.6 Evolution of ISO 14000 Series
    8. 35.7 Water Footprint
    9. 35.8 The Benefits of ISO 14000
    10. 35.9 Engineer’s Role in Environment Protection
    11. 35.10 Principles of Green Design
    12. 35.11 Basic Approaches for Resolving Environmental Problems
    13. 35.12 Guidelines for Social Responsibility
    14. 35.13 5 Rs of Wastage Utilization
    15. 35.14 Conclusion
  45. Chapter 36: Terminology Used in Japanese Management Practices
    1. Abstract
    2. 36.1 Introduction
    3. 36.2 Some of the Terminologies Cited in This Chapter
    4. 36.3 History of Development of Japanese Management Practices
    5. 36.4 Quality Circles
    6. 36.5 Kaizen
    7. 36.6 GenchiGenbutsuGenjitsu
    8. 36.7 Monozukuri and Hitozukuri
    9. 36.8 Nemawashi
    10. 36.9 Heijunka
    11. 36.10 3 Mu Checklists
    12. 36.11 Four Wives and one Husband
    13. 36.12 CREW
    14. 36.13 5 Management Objectives of Factory Management
    15. 36.14 5 Zus
    16. 36.15 Poka Yoke
    17. 36.16 Andon and Hanedashi
    18. 36.17 Jidhoka
    19. 36.18 ChakuChaku
    20. 36.19 5 S
    21. 36.20 Six Sigma
    22. 36.21 Gemba Walk
    23. 36.22 WarusaKagen
    24. 36.23 Single Minute Exchange of Die
    25. 36.24 Just in Time
    26. 36.25 Kanban
    27. 36.26 HoshinKanri
    28. 36.27 NichijoKanri
    29. 36.28 Kata
    30. 36.29 Total Productive Maintenance
    31. 36.30 Pecha-kucha
    32. 36.31 DakaraNani
    33. 36.32 Kanso, Shizen, and Shibumi
    34. 36.33 OkyaKusoma
    35. 36.34 Conclusion
  46. Annexure I: University Syllabi
    1. 1 Anna University – BE (MECH/PROD) - GE 406 - Total Quality Management
    2. 2 Anna University for MBA - GE2022 - Total Quality Management
    3. 3 Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University – Hyderabad
    4. 4 Visvesvaraya Technological University, Belgaum - 06IM72 Total Quality Management
    5. 5 Pune University - 406D - Quality Management
    6. 6 Sivaji Univ. Kolhapur, BE MECH, Total Quality Management
    7. 7 Uttar Pradesh Technical University - EME-041: Total Quality Management
    8. 8 M.J.P. Rohilkhand University, Bareilly: MBA(GEN.) CN-405 Total Quality Management
    9. 9 VTU - Total Quality Management
    10. 10 Mahatma Gandhi University, Meghalaya
    11. 11 West Bengal University - ME 821: Total Quality Management
    12. 12 Madras University for Master of Business Administration
    13. 13 Tamil Nadu Open University MBA - MSP 61 - Total Quality Management Paper
    14. 14 Indian Institute of Plant Engineers - Diploma in Plant Engineering & Management
    15. 15 Middle East Technical University
    16. 16 Prince Sultan University
    17. 17 St. Martin University, Washington State
    18. 18 University of Kokybės Vadybos (Lithuanian University)
    19. 19 University of Hradec Kralove & University of Pardubice (Czechoslovakia)
    20. 20 Cork Institute of Technology
    21. 21 A. AU & BPGTQM as a Course with 3 Quality Related Papers
    22. 22 B QE 9112 Total Quality Management
    23. 23 C QE 9122 Quality by Design
  47. Bibliography
  48. Index