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Office X for Macintosh: The Missing Manual by David Reynolds, Tonya Engst, Nan Barber

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chapter 18: the graphics programs of office x 659
Once youve highlighted a portion of the picture in this way, you can cut out the
selection, removing your ex from the picture forever, for example. You can also
apply certain effects to that portion of the picture inside or outside the lasso,
applying a dry brush effect to the background while leaving the people inside the
lasso clear.
Object Linking and Embedding (OLE)
Linked and embedded objects are both chunks of data, like drawings or spreadsheets,
nestled within a document in one Office program but actually created by another.
You edit them in whatever program created them, but behind the scenes, there’s a
big difference in where their data is stored. A linked object’s data is stored in a sepa-
rate file (what Microsoft calls the source file). An embedded object, on the other
hand, is an integral part of the file in which it appears. All its data is stored right
there in the document. Thats why an embedded object bloats the file size of the
document that contains it. However, embedding an object means that you’ll never
have to endure that sickening jolt when you realize youre missing an important
speech that you copied to your laptop (as you might if you had only used linking).
The whole process is called Object Linking and Embedding, or OLE for short. You
cant get very far on a Microsoft newsgroup or discussion board without seeing that
acronym. At user group meetings, the preferred pronunciation is olé.
Helper Programs: Chart, Equation Editor, and Graph
Office comes with several helper programs, each of which
is dedicated to one specific task: organization charts, equa-
tions, and graphs.
You’re not meant to open these programs by double-click-
ing them, as you would a normal Mac program. In fact,
Equation Editor doesn’t even have a Save command, and
Microsoft Graph can’t be launched by a double-click. In-
stead, you open one of these helper programs from within
another Office application. For example, if you’re working
in Word or PowerPoint, and you want to embed a graph
(but you don’t want to go through the hassle of opening
Excel to do the job), simply choose InsertObject.
Office presents you with a list of the possible object types
that Word can insert. Double-click the one you want, such
as Microsoft Graph. Now Microsoft Graph opens, and Office
puts a placeholder graphic in your Word document (it
shows where the graph will appear when you quit Graph).
Once your graph is finished, close Microsoft Graph; the
graph that you created appears automatically at the point
that you chose—no copy and paste necessary. (In fact, the
chart or equation appears there even if you close the helper
program’s window without saving changes! Choosing
EditUndo is the quickest way to delete the aborted im-
age from your document.)
If you’ve already created an equation, graph, or chart us-
ing one of these applications, you can edit it by double-
clicking the object. The appropriate helper program opens
automatically.
UP TO SPEED
The Picture
Toolbar

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